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First-degree relative history of alcoholism in eating disorder inpatients: relationship to eating and substance use psychopathology.
Eat Behav 2007; 8(1):15-22EB

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

We examined the influence of family history of alcoholism on the presentation and course of inpatients with eating disorders (ED) by comparing ED behaviors, substance abuse behaviors, and psychopathology of patients with alcoholic first-degree relatives (AFDR+) to those without alcoholic first-degree relatives (AFDR-).

METHOD

Female inpatients admitted to a specialty eating disorders service completed demographic, family history, behavioral, and psychological questionnaires (N=217). Body mass index (BMI) at admission and discharge, length of stay, and rates of weight gain were calculated.

RESULTS

AFDR+ participants did not differ from AFDR- participants diagnostically, but AFDR+ participants did report higher lifetime frequencies of several ED and substance abuse behaviors. Measures of ED psychopathology and personality vulnerability were also elevated in the AFDR+ group.

DISCUSSION

ED inpatients with a first-degree family history of alcoholism demonstrate increased psychopathology in eating behavior, substance use, and personality vulnerability domains. While the genetic diathesis for alcoholism is likely distinct from that for eating disorders, these findings suggest that first-degree relative history of alcoholism may nevertheless exert a negative influence on eating disorder behaviors.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Phipps 315, 600 N. Wolfe St., Baltimore, MD 21287, USA. gwr@jhmi.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17174847

Citation

Redgrave, Graham W., et al. "First-degree Relative History of Alcoholism in Eating Disorder Inpatients: Relationship to Eating and Substance Use Psychopathology." Eating Behaviors, vol. 8, no. 1, 2007, pp. 15-22.
Redgrave GW, Coughlin JW, Heinberg LJ, et al. First-degree relative history of alcoholism in eating disorder inpatients: relationship to eating and substance use psychopathology. Eat Behav. 2007;8(1):15-22.
Redgrave, G. W., Coughlin, J. W., Heinberg, L. J., & Guarda, A. S. (2007). First-degree relative history of alcoholism in eating disorder inpatients: relationship to eating and substance use psychopathology. Eating Behaviors, 8(1), pp. 15-22.
Redgrave GW, et al. First-degree Relative History of Alcoholism in Eating Disorder Inpatients: Relationship to Eating and Substance Use Psychopathology. Eat Behav. 2007;8(1):15-22. PubMed PMID: 17174847.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - First-degree relative history of alcoholism in eating disorder inpatients: relationship to eating and substance use psychopathology. AU - Redgrave,Graham W, AU - Coughlin,Janelle W, AU - Heinberg,Leslie J, AU - Guarda,Angela S, Y1 - 2006/02/20/ PY - 2005/10/07/received PY - 2005/11/23/revised PY - 2006/01/25/accepted PY - 2006/12/19/pubmed PY - 2007/3/21/medline PY - 2006/12/19/entrez SP - 15 EP - 22 JF - Eating behaviors JO - Eat Behav VL - 8 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: We examined the influence of family history of alcoholism on the presentation and course of inpatients with eating disorders (ED) by comparing ED behaviors, substance abuse behaviors, and psychopathology of patients with alcoholic first-degree relatives (AFDR+) to those without alcoholic first-degree relatives (AFDR-). METHOD: Female inpatients admitted to a specialty eating disorders service completed demographic, family history, behavioral, and psychological questionnaires (N=217). Body mass index (BMI) at admission and discharge, length of stay, and rates of weight gain were calculated. RESULTS: AFDR+ participants did not differ from AFDR- participants diagnostically, but AFDR+ participants did report higher lifetime frequencies of several ED and substance abuse behaviors. Measures of ED psychopathology and personality vulnerability were also elevated in the AFDR+ group. DISCUSSION: ED inpatients with a first-degree family history of alcoholism demonstrate increased psychopathology in eating behavior, substance use, and personality vulnerability domains. While the genetic diathesis for alcoholism is likely distinct from that for eating disorders, these findings suggest that first-degree relative history of alcoholism may nevertheless exert a negative influence on eating disorder behaviors. SN - 1471-0153 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17174847/First_degree_relative_history_of_alcoholism_in_eating_disorder_inpatients:_relationship_to_eating_and_substance_use_psychopathology_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1471-0153(06)00003-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -