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Implications of high-risk family studies for prevention of depression.
Am J Prev Med. 2006 Dec; 31(6 Suppl 1):S126-35.AJ

Abstract

The high-risk family study is a powerful design that facilitates identification of early forms of expression of depression and premorbid vulnerability, risk, and protective factors that are important for defining prevention targets and program foci. This paper (1) highlights the strengths of high-risk studies for informing early intervention efforts; (2) summarizes findings of familial aggregation from controlled high-risk studies of depression; and (3) briefly reviews evidence for potential mediators (i.e., early forms of expression, vulnerability factors) that explain familial risk and for moderators (i.e., interactive risk and protective factors) that enhance or minimize familial risk. New data from the Yale High-Risk Study of Comorbidity of Substance Use and Affective Disorders are presented to exemplify strategies for identifying specific familial pathways to depression among offspring of parents with substance and anxiety disorders. Likewise, parental depression is associated with a range of emotional and behavioral problems, including anxiety and conduct disorder, in their offspring. These nonspecific effects, together with emerging findings on mechanisms of risk, support early intervention efforts that target a range of youth at risk for depression through multipronged approaches that attend to the individual characteristics of the child and parent, clinical comorbidity, and the broader family and social context.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Pediatric Translational Research and Treatment Development, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA. shelli.avenevoli@nih.govNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17175407

Citation

Avenevoli, Shelli, and Kathleen Ries Merikangas. "Implications of High-risk Family Studies for Prevention of Depression." American Journal of Preventive Medicine, vol. 31, no. 6 Suppl 1, 2006, pp. S126-35.
Avenevoli S, Merikangas KR. Implications of high-risk family studies for prevention of depression. Am J Prev Med. 2006;31(6 Suppl 1):S126-35.
Avenevoli, S., & Merikangas, K. R. (2006). Implications of high-risk family studies for prevention of depression. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 31(6 Suppl 1), S126-35.
Avenevoli S, Merikangas KR. Implications of High-risk Family Studies for Prevention of Depression. Am J Prev Med. 2006;31(6 Suppl 1):S126-35. PubMed PMID: 17175407.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Implications of high-risk family studies for prevention of depression. AU - Avenevoli,Shelli, AU - Merikangas,Kathleen Ries, PY - 2005/05/20/received PY - 2006/06/29/revised PY - 2006/07/17/accepted PY - 2006/12/19/pubmed PY - 2007/3/31/medline PY - 2006/12/19/entrez SP - S126 EP - 35 JF - American journal of preventive medicine JO - Am J Prev Med VL - 31 IS - 6 Suppl 1 N2 - The high-risk family study is a powerful design that facilitates identification of early forms of expression of depression and premorbid vulnerability, risk, and protective factors that are important for defining prevention targets and program foci. This paper (1) highlights the strengths of high-risk studies for informing early intervention efforts; (2) summarizes findings of familial aggregation from controlled high-risk studies of depression; and (3) briefly reviews evidence for potential mediators (i.e., early forms of expression, vulnerability factors) that explain familial risk and for moderators (i.e., interactive risk and protective factors) that enhance or minimize familial risk. New data from the Yale High-Risk Study of Comorbidity of Substance Use and Affective Disorders are presented to exemplify strategies for identifying specific familial pathways to depression among offspring of parents with substance and anxiety disorders. Likewise, parental depression is associated with a range of emotional and behavioral problems, including anxiety and conduct disorder, in their offspring. These nonspecific effects, together with emerging findings on mechanisms of risk, support early intervention efforts that target a range of youth at risk for depression through multipronged approaches that attend to the individual characteristics of the child and parent, clinical comorbidity, and the broader family and social context. SN - 0749-3797 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17175407/Implications_of_high_risk_family_studies_for_prevention_of_depression_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0749-3797(06)00244-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -