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Effect of undegradable intake protein supplementation on intake, digestion, microbial efficiency, in situ disappearance, and plasma hormones and metabolites in steers fed low-quality grass hay.
J Anim Sci 2007; 85(4):1092-101JA

Abstract

Four ruminally and duodenally cannulated beef steers (492 +/- 30 kg) were used in a 4 x 4 Latin square design to evaluate the effect of undegradable intake protein (UIP) supplementation on intake, digestion, microbial efficiency, in situ disappearance, and plasma hormones and metabolites in steers fed low-quality grass hay. The steers were offered chopped (10.2 cm in length) grass hay (6.0% CP) ad libitum and 1 of 4 supplements. Supplemental treatments (1,040 g of DM daily), offered daily at 0800, were control (no supplement) or low, medium, or high levels of UIP (the supplements provided 8.3, 203.8, and 422.2 g of UIP/ d, respectively). The supplements were formulated to provide similar amounts of degradable intake protein (22%) and energy (1.77 Mcal of NE(m)/kg). Blood samples were taken at -2, -0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, and 24 h after supplementation on d 1 (intensive sampling) and at -0.5 h before supplementation on d 2, 3, 4, and 5 (daily sampling) of each collection period. Contrasts comparing control vs. low, medium, and high; low vs. medium and high; and medium vs. high levels of UIP were conducted. Apparent and true ruminal OM and N digestion increased (P < 0.03) in steers fed supplemental protein compared with controls, but there were no differences (P > 0.26) among supplemental protein treatments. There were no differences (P > 0.11) among treatments for NDF or ADF digestion, or total ruminal VFA or microbial protein synthesis. Ruminal pH was not different (P = 0.32) between control and protein-supplemented treatments; however, ruminal pH was greater (P = 0.02) for supplementation with medium and high compared with low UIP. Daily plasma insulin concentrations were increased (P = 0.004) in protein-supplemented steers compared with controls and were reduced (P = 0.003) in steers fed low UIP compared with steers fed greater levels of UIP. Intensive and daily plasma urea N concentrations were increased (P < 0.01) in protein-supplemented steers compared with controls and increased (P < 0.02) for intensive and daily sampling, respectively, in steers supplemented with medium and high UIP compared with low UIP. Supplemental protein increased apparent and true ruminal OM and N digestion, and medium and high levels of UIP increased ruminal pH compared with the low level. An increasing level of UIP increases urea N and baseline plasma insulin concentrations in steers fed low-quality hay.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Animal and Range Sciences, North Dakota State University, Fargo 58105, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Controlled Clinical Trial
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17178812

Citation

Reed, J J., et al. "Effect of Undegradable Intake Protein Supplementation On Intake, Digestion, Microbial Efficiency, in Situ Disappearance, and Plasma Hormones and Metabolites in Steers Fed Low-quality Grass Hay." Journal of Animal Science, vol. 85, no. 4, 2007, pp. 1092-101.
Reed JJ, O'Neil MR, Lardy GP, et al. Effect of undegradable intake protein supplementation on intake, digestion, microbial efficiency, in situ disappearance, and plasma hormones and metabolites in steers fed low-quality grass hay. J Anim Sci. 2007;85(4):1092-101.
Reed, J. J., O'Neil, M. R., Lardy, G. P., Vonnahme, K. A., Reynolds, L. P., & Caton, J. S. (2007). Effect of undegradable intake protein supplementation on intake, digestion, microbial efficiency, in situ disappearance, and plasma hormones and metabolites in steers fed low-quality grass hay. Journal of Animal Science, 85(4), pp. 1092-101.
Reed JJ, et al. Effect of Undegradable Intake Protein Supplementation On Intake, Digestion, Microbial Efficiency, in Situ Disappearance, and Plasma Hormones and Metabolites in Steers Fed Low-quality Grass Hay. J Anim Sci. 2007;85(4):1092-101. PubMed PMID: 17178812.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of undegradable intake protein supplementation on intake, digestion, microbial efficiency, in situ disappearance, and plasma hormones and metabolites in steers fed low-quality grass hay. AU - Reed,J J, AU - O'Neil,M R, AU - Lardy,G P, AU - Vonnahme,K A, AU - Reynolds,L P, AU - Caton,J S, Y1 - 2006/12/18/ PY - 2006/12/21/pubmed PY - 2007/4/24/medline PY - 2006/12/21/entrez SP - 1092 EP - 101 JF - Journal of animal science JO - J. Anim. Sci. VL - 85 IS - 4 N2 - Four ruminally and duodenally cannulated beef steers (492 +/- 30 kg) were used in a 4 x 4 Latin square design to evaluate the effect of undegradable intake protein (UIP) supplementation on intake, digestion, microbial efficiency, in situ disappearance, and plasma hormones and metabolites in steers fed low-quality grass hay. The steers were offered chopped (10.2 cm in length) grass hay (6.0% CP) ad libitum and 1 of 4 supplements. Supplemental treatments (1,040 g of DM daily), offered daily at 0800, were control (no supplement) or low, medium, or high levels of UIP (the supplements provided 8.3, 203.8, and 422.2 g of UIP/ d, respectively). The supplements were formulated to provide similar amounts of degradable intake protein (22%) and energy (1.77 Mcal of NE(m)/kg). Blood samples were taken at -2, -0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, and 24 h after supplementation on d 1 (intensive sampling) and at -0.5 h before supplementation on d 2, 3, 4, and 5 (daily sampling) of each collection period. Contrasts comparing control vs. low, medium, and high; low vs. medium and high; and medium vs. high levels of UIP were conducted. Apparent and true ruminal OM and N digestion increased (P < 0.03) in steers fed supplemental protein compared with controls, but there were no differences (P > 0.26) among supplemental protein treatments. There were no differences (P > 0.11) among treatments for NDF or ADF digestion, or total ruminal VFA or microbial protein synthesis. Ruminal pH was not different (P = 0.32) between control and protein-supplemented treatments; however, ruminal pH was greater (P = 0.02) for supplementation with medium and high compared with low UIP. Daily plasma insulin concentrations were increased (P = 0.004) in protein-supplemented steers compared with controls and were reduced (P = 0.003) in steers fed low UIP compared with steers fed greater levels of UIP. Intensive and daily plasma urea N concentrations were increased (P < 0.01) in protein-supplemented steers compared with controls and increased (P < 0.02) for intensive and daily sampling, respectively, in steers supplemented with medium and high UIP compared with low UIP. Supplemental protein increased apparent and true ruminal OM and N digestion, and medium and high levels of UIP increased ruminal pH compared with the low level. An increasing level of UIP increases urea N and baseline plasma insulin concentrations in steers fed low-quality hay. SN - 1525-3163 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17178812/Effect_of_undegradable_intake_protein_supplementation_on_intake_digestion_microbial_efficiency_in_situ_disappearance_and_plasma_hormones_and_metabolites_in_steers_fed_low_quality_grass_hay_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jas/article-lookup/doi/10.2527/jas.2006-619 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -