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The psychological effect of severe acute respiratory syndrome on emergency department staff.
Emerg Med J. 2007 Jan; 24(1):12-7.EM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak in 2003 affected 29 countries. The SARS outbreak was unique in its rapid transmission and it resulted in heavy stress in first-line healthcare workers, particularly in the emergency department.

AIM

: To determine the influence of SARS on the psychological status, including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, of the staff in the emergency department.

METHODS

To investigate whether different working conditions in the hospital led to different psychological effects on healthcare workers, the psychological effect on emergency department staff in the high-risk ward was compared with that on psychiatric ward staff in the medium-risk ward. Davidson Trauma Scale-Chinese version (DTS-C) and Chinese Health Questionnaire-12 (CHQ-12) items were designed to check the psychological status of the staff in the month after the end of the SARS outbreak.

RESULTS

86 of 92 (93.5%) medical staff considered the SARS outbreak to be a traumatic experience. The DTS-C scores of staff in the emergency department and in the psychiatric ward were significantly different (p = 0.04). No significant difference in CHQ score was observed between the two groups. Emergency department staff had more severe PTSD symptoms than staff in the psychiatric ward.

CONCLUSION

SARS was a traumatic experience for healthcare providers in Taiwan. Most staff in the emergency department and in the psychiatric ward had PTSD. Emergency department staff had more severe PTSD symptoms than staff in the psychiatric ward.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, Chang Hwa Hospital, Department of Health, Chang Hwa, Taiwan, ROC.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17183035

Citation

Lin, C-Y, et al. "The Psychological Effect of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome On Emergency Department Staff." Emergency Medicine Journal : EMJ, vol. 24, no. 1, 2007, pp. 12-7.
Lin CY, Peng YC, Wu YH, et al. The psychological effect of severe acute respiratory syndrome on emergency department staff. Emerg Med J. 2007;24(1):12-7.
Lin, C. Y., Peng, Y. C., Wu, Y. H., Chang, J., Chan, C. H., & Yang, D. Y. (2007). The psychological effect of severe acute respiratory syndrome on emergency department staff. Emergency Medicine Journal : EMJ, 24(1), 12-7.
Lin CY, et al. The Psychological Effect of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome On Emergency Department Staff. Emerg Med J. 2007;24(1):12-7. PubMed PMID: 17183035.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The psychological effect of severe acute respiratory syndrome on emergency department staff. AU - Lin,C-Y, AU - Peng,Y-C, AU - Wu,Y-H, AU - Chang,J, AU - Chan,C-H, AU - Yang,D-Y, PY - 2006/12/22/pubmed PY - 2007/2/27/medline PY - 2006/12/22/entrez SP - 12 EP - 7 JF - Emergency medicine journal : EMJ JO - Emerg Med J VL - 24 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: The severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak in 2003 affected 29 countries. The SARS outbreak was unique in its rapid transmission and it resulted in heavy stress in first-line healthcare workers, particularly in the emergency department. AIM: : To determine the influence of SARS on the psychological status, including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, of the staff in the emergency department. METHODS: To investigate whether different working conditions in the hospital led to different psychological effects on healthcare workers, the psychological effect on emergency department staff in the high-risk ward was compared with that on psychiatric ward staff in the medium-risk ward. Davidson Trauma Scale-Chinese version (DTS-C) and Chinese Health Questionnaire-12 (CHQ-12) items were designed to check the psychological status of the staff in the month after the end of the SARS outbreak. RESULTS: 86 of 92 (93.5%) medical staff considered the SARS outbreak to be a traumatic experience. The DTS-C scores of staff in the emergency department and in the psychiatric ward were significantly different (p = 0.04). No significant difference in CHQ score was observed between the two groups. Emergency department staff had more severe PTSD symptoms than staff in the psychiatric ward. CONCLUSION: SARS was a traumatic experience for healthcare providers in Taiwan. Most staff in the emergency department and in the psychiatric ward had PTSD. Emergency department staff had more severe PTSD symptoms than staff in the psychiatric ward. SN - 1472-0213 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17183035/The_psychological_effect_of_severe_acute_respiratory_syndrome_on_emergency_department_staff_ L2 - https://emj.bmj.com/lookup/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=17183035 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -