Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Reduced plasma free fatty acid availability during exercise: effect on gene expression.
Eur J Appl Physiol. 2007 Mar; 99(5):485-93.EJ

Abstract

Endurance exercise transiently increases the mRNA of key regulatory proteins involved in skeletal muscle metabolism. During prolonged exercise and subsequent recovery, circulating plasma fatty acid (FA) concentrations are elevated. The present study therefore aimed to determine the sensitivity of key metabolic genes to FA exposure, assessed in vitro using L6 myocytes and secondly, to measure the expression of these same set of genes in vivo, following a single exercise bout when the post-exercise rise in plasma FA is abolished by acipimox. Initial studies using L6 myotubes demonstrated dose responsive sensitivity for both PDK4 and PGC-1alpha mRNA to acute FA exposure in vitro. Nine active males performed two trials consisting of 2 h exercise, followed by 2 h of recovery. In one trial, plasma FA availability was reduced by the administration of acipimox (LFA), a pharmacological inhibitor of adipose tissue lipolysis, and in the second trial a placebo was provided (CON). During the exercise bout and during recovery, the rise in plasma FA and glycerol was abolished by acipimox treatment. Following exercise the mRNA abundance of PDK4 and PGC-1alpha were elevated and unaffected by either acipimox or placebo. Further analysis of skeletal muscle gene expression demonstrated that the CPT I gene was suppressed in both trials, whilst UCP-3 gene was only modestly regulated by exercise alone. Acipimox ingestion did not alter the response for both CPT I and UCP-3. Thus, this study demonstrates that the normal increase in circulating concentrations of FA during the later stages of exercise and subsequent recovery is not required to induce skeletal muscle mRNA expression of several proteins involved in regulating substrate metabolism.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Exercise and Nutritional Sciences, Deakin University, 221 Burwood Highway, Burwood, VIC, 3125, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17186295

Citation

Tunstall, Rebecca J., et al. "Reduced Plasma Free Fatty Acid Availability During Exercise: Effect On Gene Expression." European Journal of Applied Physiology, vol. 99, no. 5, 2007, pp. 485-93.
Tunstall RJ, McAinch AJ, Hargreaves M, et al. Reduced plasma free fatty acid availability during exercise: effect on gene expression. Eur J Appl Physiol. 2007;99(5):485-93.
Tunstall, R. J., McAinch, A. J., Hargreaves, M., van Loon, L. J., & Cameron-Smith, D. (2007). Reduced plasma free fatty acid availability during exercise: effect on gene expression. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 99(5), 485-93.
Tunstall RJ, et al. Reduced Plasma Free Fatty Acid Availability During Exercise: Effect On Gene Expression. Eur J Appl Physiol. 2007;99(5):485-93. PubMed PMID: 17186295.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Reduced plasma free fatty acid availability during exercise: effect on gene expression. AU - Tunstall,Rebecca J, AU - McAinch,Andrew J, AU - Hargreaves,Mark, AU - van Loon,Luc J C, AU - Cameron-Smith,David, Y1 - 2006/12/22/ PY - 2006/12/02/accepted PY - 2006/12/23/pubmed PY - 2007/4/21/medline PY - 2006/12/23/entrez SP - 485 EP - 93 JF - European journal of applied physiology JO - Eur. J. Appl. Physiol. VL - 99 IS - 5 N2 - Endurance exercise transiently increases the mRNA of key regulatory proteins involved in skeletal muscle metabolism. During prolonged exercise and subsequent recovery, circulating plasma fatty acid (FA) concentrations are elevated. The present study therefore aimed to determine the sensitivity of key metabolic genes to FA exposure, assessed in vitro using L6 myocytes and secondly, to measure the expression of these same set of genes in vivo, following a single exercise bout when the post-exercise rise in plasma FA is abolished by acipimox. Initial studies using L6 myotubes demonstrated dose responsive sensitivity for both PDK4 and PGC-1alpha mRNA to acute FA exposure in vitro. Nine active males performed two trials consisting of 2 h exercise, followed by 2 h of recovery. In one trial, plasma FA availability was reduced by the administration of acipimox (LFA), a pharmacological inhibitor of adipose tissue lipolysis, and in the second trial a placebo was provided (CON). During the exercise bout and during recovery, the rise in plasma FA and glycerol was abolished by acipimox treatment. Following exercise the mRNA abundance of PDK4 and PGC-1alpha were elevated and unaffected by either acipimox or placebo. Further analysis of skeletal muscle gene expression demonstrated that the CPT I gene was suppressed in both trials, whilst UCP-3 gene was only modestly regulated by exercise alone. Acipimox ingestion did not alter the response for both CPT I and UCP-3. Thus, this study demonstrates that the normal increase in circulating concentrations of FA during the later stages of exercise and subsequent recovery is not required to induce skeletal muscle mRNA expression of several proteins involved in regulating substrate metabolism. SN - 1439-6319 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17186295/Reduced_plasma_free_fatty_acid_availability_during_exercise:_effect_on_gene_expression_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00421-006-0376-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -