Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Parkinson's disease: diagnosis and treatment.
Am Fam Physician. 2006 Dec 15; 74(12):2046-54.AF

Abstract

Parkinson's disease is a common neurodegenerative disorder that can cause significant disability and decreased quality of life. The cardinal physical signs of the disease are distal resting tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, and asymmetric onset. Levodopa is the primary treatment for Parkinson's disease; however, its long-term use is limited by motor complications and drug-induced dyskinesia. Dopamine agonists are options for initial treatment and have been shown to delay the onset of motor complications. However, dopamine agonists are inferior to levodopa in controlling motor symptoms. After levodopa-related motor complications develop in advanced Parkinson's disease, it is beneficial to initiate adjuvant therapy with dopamine agonists, catechol O-methyltransferase inhibitors, or monoamine oxidase-B inhibitors. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus has been shown to ameliorate symptoms in patients with advanced disease. Depression, dementia, and psychosis are common psychiatric problems associated with Parkinson's disease. Psychosis is usually drug induced and can be managed initially by reducing antiparkinsonian medications. The judicious use of psychoactive agents may be necessary. Consultation with a subspecialist is often required.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Texas Southwestern Medical School at Dallas Family Medicine Residency Program, Dallas, Texas 75390, USA. shobha.rao@utsouthwestern.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17186710

Citation

Rao, Shobha S., et al. "Parkinson's Disease: Diagnosis and Treatment." American Family Physician, vol. 74, no. 12, 2006, pp. 2046-54.
Rao SS, Hofmann LA, Shakil A. Parkinson's disease: diagnosis and treatment. Am Fam Physician. 2006;74(12):2046-54.
Rao, S. S., Hofmann, L. A., & Shakil, A. (2006). Parkinson's disease: diagnosis and treatment. American Family Physician, 74(12), 2046-54.
Rao SS, Hofmann LA, Shakil A. Parkinson's Disease: Diagnosis and Treatment. Am Fam Physician. 2006 Dec 15;74(12):2046-54. PubMed PMID: 17186710.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Parkinson's disease: diagnosis and treatment. AU - Rao,Shobha S, AU - Hofmann,Laura A, AU - Shakil,Amer, PY - 2006/12/26/pubmed PY - 2007/1/20/medline PY - 2006/12/26/entrez SP - 2046 EP - 54 JF - American family physician JO - Am Fam Physician VL - 74 IS - 12 N2 - Parkinson's disease is a common neurodegenerative disorder that can cause significant disability and decreased quality of life. The cardinal physical signs of the disease are distal resting tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, and asymmetric onset. Levodopa is the primary treatment for Parkinson's disease; however, its long-term use is limited by motor complications and drug-induced dyskinesia. Dopamine agonists are options for initial treatment and have been shown to delay the onset of motor complications. However, dopamine agonists are inferior to levodopa in controlling motor symptoms. After levodopa-related motor complications develop in advanced Parkinson's disease, it is beneficial to initiate adjuvant therapy with dopamine agonists, catechol O-methyltransferase inhibitors, or monoamine oxidase-B inhibitors. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus has been shown to ameliorate symptoms in patients with advanced disease. Depression, dementia, and psychosis are common psychiatric problems associated with Parkinson's disease. Psychosis is usually drug induced and can be managed initially by reducing antiparkinsonian medications. The judicious use of psychoactive agents may be necessary. Consultation with a subspecialist is often required. SN - 0002-838X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17186710/Parkinson's_disease:_diagnosis_and_treatment_ L2 - https://www.aafp.org/link_out?pmid=17186710 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -