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Risk of lung cancer from residential heating and cooking fuels in Montreal, Canada.
Am J Epidemiol 2007; 165(6):634-42AJ

Abstract

Among the major sources of indoor air pollution are combustion by-products from heating and cooking. Concern is increasing that use of polluting heating and cooking sources can increase cancer risk. In Canada, most cooking and heating currently relies on electricity or natural gas, but, in the past, and still in some areas, coal and wood stoves were used for heating and gas and wood for cooking. In the course of a case-control study of lung cancer carried out in Montreal in 1996-2001, the authors collected information on subjects' lifetime exposure to such sources of domestic pollution by means of a personal interview with the subject or a next-of-kin proxy. Questionnaires were completed for 739 male cases, 925 male controls, 466 female cases, and 616 female controls. Odds ratios were computed in relation to a few indices of exposure to traditional heating and cooking sources, adjusting for a number of covariates, including smoking. Among men, there was no indication of excess risks. Among women, the odds ratio for those exposed to both traditional heating and cooking sources was 2.5 (95% confidence interval: 1.5, 3.6; n = 253). The findings for women suggest the need for research dedicated to exploring this association, with particular emphasis on improved exposure assessment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

CHUM Research Centre, University of Montreal, 3875 St-Urbain #312, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17189590

Citation

Ramanakumar, Agnihotram V., et al. "Risk of Lung Cancer From Residential Heating and Cooking Fuels in Montreal, Canada." American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 165, no. 6, 2007, pp. 634-42.
Ramanakumar AV, Parent ME, Siemiatycki J. Risk of lung cancer from residential heating and cooking fuels in Montreal, Canada. Am J Epidemiol. 2007;165(6):634-42.
Ramanakumar, A. V., Parent, M. E., & Siemiatycki, J. (2007). Risk of lung cancer from residential heating and cooking fuels in Montreal, Canada. American Journal of Epidemiology, 165(6), pp. 634-42.
Ramanakumar AV, Parent ME, Siemiatycki J. Risk of Lung Cancer From Residential Heating and Cooking Fuels in Montreal, Canada. Am J Epidemiol. 2007 Mar 15;165(6):634-42. PubMed PMID: 17189590.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Risk of lung cancer from residential heating and cooking fuels in Montreal, Canada. AU - Ramanakumar,Agnihotram V, AU - Parent,Marie-Elise, AU - Siemiatycki,Jack, Y1 - 2006/12/22/ PY - 2006/12/26/pubmed PY - 2007/3/31/medline PY - 2006/12/26/entrez SP - 634 EP - 42 JF - American journal of epidemiology JO - Am. J. Epidemiol. VL - 165 IS - 6 N2 - Among the major sources of indoor air pollution are combustion by-products from heating and cooking. Concern is increasing that use of polluting heating and cooking sources can increase cancer risk. In Canada, most cooking and heating currently relies on electricity or natural gas, but, in the past, and still in some areas, coal and wood stoves were used for heating and gas and wood for cooking. In the course of a case-control study of lung cancer carried out in Montreal in 1996-2001, the authors collected information on subjects' lifetime exposure to such sources of domestic pollution by means of a personal interview with the subject or a next-of-kin proxy. Questionnaires were completed for 739 male cases, 925 male controls, 466 female cases, and 616 female controls. Odds ratios were computed in relation to a few indices of exposure to traditional heating and cooking sources, adjusting for a number of covariates, including smoking. Among men, there was no indication of excess risks. Among women, the odds ratio for those exposed to both traditional heating and cooking sources was 2.5 (95% confidence interval: 1.5, 3.6; n = 253). The findings for women suggest the need for research dedicated to exploring this association, with particular emphasis on improved exposure assessment. SN - 0002-9262 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17189590/Risk_of_lung_cancer_from_residential_heating_and_cooking_fuels_in_Montreal_Canada_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/aje/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/aje/kwk117 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -