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Posttraumatic stress after a motor vehicle accident: a six-month follow-up study utilizing latent growth modeling.
J Trauma Stress. 2006 Dec; 19(6):923-36.JT

Abstract

Features of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) for 596 survivors of motor vehicle accidents were examined by self-report measures at 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months after the motor vehicle accident (MVA). Latent growth modeling was utilized to study the trend and predictors of the level of distress. Results indicated that 5-20% of the participants reported to have a significant level of posttraumatic stress in one, two, or three of the PTSD symptom clusters within the period studied. Survivors with significant acute stress 1 week after the MVA had a higher risk for developing chronic posttraumatic stress. Although the severity of intrusive and hyperarousal symptoms decreased over time, the severity of avoidance symptoms remained unchanged. Factors predicting the course of PTSD after an MVA are identified.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Clinical Psychology, Caritas Medical Centre, Sham Shui Po, Hong Kong, People's Republic of China. wukyk@ha.org.hkNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17195968

Citation

Wu, Kitty K., and Mike W L. Cheung. "Posttraumatic Stress After a Motor Vehicle Accident: a Six-month Follow-up Study Utilizing Latent Growth Modeling." Journal of Traumatic Stress, vol. 19, no. 6, 2006, pp. 923-36.
Wu KK, Cheung MW. Posttraumatic stress after a motor vehicle accident: a six-month follow-up study utilizing latent growth modeling. J Trauma Stress. 2006;19(6):923-36.
Wu, K. K., & Cheung, M. W. (2006). Posttraumatic stress after a motor vehicle accident: a six-month follow-up study utilizing latent growth modeling. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 19(6), 923-36.
Wu KK, Cheung MW. Posttraumatic Stress After a Motor Vehicle Accident: a Six-month Follow-up Study Utilizing Latent Growth Modeling. J Trauma Stress. 2006;19(6):923-36. PubMed PMID: 17195968.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Posttraumatic stress after a motor vehicle accident: a six-month follow-up study utilizing latent growth modeling. AU - Wu,Kitty K, AU - Cheung,Mike W L, PY - 2007/1/2/pubmed PY - 2007/3/14/medline PY - 2007/1/2/entrez SP - 923 EP - 36 JF - Journal of traumatic stress JO - J Trauma Stress VL - 19 IS - 6 N2 - Features of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) for 596 survivors of motor vehicle accidents were examined by self-report measures at 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months after the motor vehicle accident (MVA). Latent growth modeling was utilized to study the trend and predictors of the level of distress. Results indicated that 5-20% of the participants reported to have a significant level of posttraumatic stress in one, two, or three of the PTSD symptom clusters within the period studied. Survivors with significant acute stress 1 week after the MVA had a higher risk for developing chronic posttraumatic stress. Although the severity of intrusive and hyperarousal symptoms decreased over time, the severity of avoidance symptoms remained unchanged. Factors predicting the course of PTSD after an MVA are identified. SN - 0894-9867 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17195968/Posttraumatic_stress_after_a_motor_vehicle_accident:_a_six_month_follow_up_study_utilizing_latent_growth_modeling_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/jts.20178 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -