Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

An electrophysiological comparison of recollection for emotional words using an exclusion recognition paradigm.
Brain Res. 2007 Feb 16; 1133(1):100-9.BR

Abstract

The positive-going shift of event-related potential (ERP) components that occur when recognizing emotional words has been thought to be due to valence effects on either recollection or familiarity. This study investigated the independent contributions of recollection and familiarity on recognition of emotional words in order to examine which is thus responsible for the greater magnitude of ERP components seen in response to recognition of emotional, as opposed to neutral words. ERPs were measured while participants completed an exclusion recognition task. In the test phase, participants were required to respond "old" only to target items, which were included in one of two lists that were presented in the study phase. They were also asked to respond "new" to distracters and non-target items that were in the other previously presented list. "Old" responses to targets and non-targets were contrasted with an ERP analysis. Results suggested that the late positivity reflected recollection. The magnitude of this positivity, elicited around the left parietal area, was greater for negative stimuli compared to neutral and positive stimuli. The findings of the present study suggested that enhanced recollection of negative words may contribute to increased magnitudes of components such as the LPC. The emotional valence of words may have separate behavioral and electrophysiological effects on recollection and familiarity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Graduate School of Information Systems, Department of Information Management Science, The University of Electro-Communications, 1-5-1 Chofugaoka, Chofu-City, Tokyo 182-8585, Japan. inaba@is.uec.ac.jpNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17196554

Citation

Inaba, Midori, et al. "An Electrophysiological Comparison of Recollection for Emotional Words Using an Exclusion Recognition Paradigm." Brain Research, vol. 1133, no. 1, 2007, pp. 100-9.
Inaba M, Kamishima K, Ohira H. An electrophysiological comparison of recollection for emotional words using an exclusion recognition paradigm. Brain Res. 2007;1133(1):100-9.
Inaba, M., Kamishima, K., & Ohira, H. (2007). An electrophysiological comparison of recollection for emotional words using an exclusion recognition paradigm. Brain Research, 1133(1), 100-9.
Inaba M, Kamishima K, Ohira H. An Electrophysiological Comparison of Recollection for Emotional Words Using an Exclusion Recognition Paradigm. Brain Res. 2007 Feb 16;1133(1):100-9. PubMed PMID: 17196554.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - An electrophysiological comparison of recollection for emotional words using an exclusion recognition paradigm. AU - Inaba,Midori, AU - Kamishima,Kyoko, AU - Ohira,Hideki, Y1 - 2006/12/29/ PY - 2005/04/19/received PY - 2006/06/22/revised PY - 2006/07/05/accepted PY - 2007/1/2/pubmed PY - 2007/4/6/medline PY - 2007/1/2/entrez SP - 100 EP - 9 JF - Brain research JO - Brain Res VL - 1133 IS - 1 N2 - The positive-going shift of event-related potential (ERP) components that occur when recognizing emotional words has been thought to be due to valence effects on either recollection or familiarity. This study investigated the independent contributions of recollection and familiarity on recognition of emotional words in order to examine which is thus responsible for the greater magnitude of ERP components seen in response to recognition of emotional, as opposed to neutral words. ERPs were measured while participants completed an exclusion recognition task. In the test phase, participants were required to respond "old" only to target items, which were included in one of two lists that were presented in the study phase. They were also asked to respond "new" to distracters and non-target items that were in the other previously presented list. "Old" responses to targets and non-targets were contrasted with an ERP analysis. Results suggested that the late positivity reflected recollection. The magnitude of this positivity, elicited around the left parietal area, was greater for negative stimuli compared to neutral and positive stimuli. The findings of the present study suggested that enhanced recollection of negative words may contribute to increased magnitudes of components such as the LPC. The emotional valence of words may have separate behavioral and electrophysiological effects on recollection and familiarity. SN - 0006-8993 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17196554/An_electrophysiological_comparison_of_recollection_for_emotional_words_using_an_exclusion_recognition_paradigm_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0006-8993(06)02094-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -