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Genetic polymorphism of the angiotensin converting enzyme and L-dopa-induced adverse effects in Parkinson's disease.
J Neurol Sci. 2007 Jan 31; 252(2):130-4.JN

Abstract

There was increasing evidence suggesting that angiotensin I-converting enzyme may play an important role in the pathogenesis of PD. Our former study has shown that angiotensin I-converting enzyme gene (ACE) may confer a susceptibility for the risk of Parkinson's disease (PD). Meanwhile, recent studies have emphasized that genetic factors may involve in the occurrence of the adverse effects of chronic L-dopa therapy in PD patients. This study was designed to assess whether genetic polymorphism of the ACE could be a predictor of L-dopa-induced adverse effects in PD. There were 251 patients included in this study and their mean age at onset of disease was 63.3+/-11.4 years. The duration of disease and the treatment with L-dopa was 6.3+/-5.1 and 5.0+/-4.3 years, respectively. The frequency of the homozygote ACE-II genotype of the ACE in PD patients with L-dopa-induced psychosis was significantly higher than that in PD patients without the adverse effect (63.3% vs 43.0%; chi(2)=6.347, OR=1.435, 95%CI=1.105-1.864, p=0.012). However, the ACE polymorphism was not associated with the risk to develop dyskinesia or motor fluctuation induced by L-dopa. Furthermore, a logistic regression analysis confirmed that the ACE-II genotype was an independent risk factor for L-dopa-induced psychosis in PD patients (OR=2.542, p=0.012). In conclusion, results of the study showed that ACE-II genotype might confer a primary predictor for the occurrence of psychosis in L-dopa-treated PD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurology, Chushang Show-Chwan Hospital, Nantou, 557, Taiwan. jjlinn@tcts.seed.net.twNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17196621

Citation

Lin, Juei-Jueng, et al. "Genetic Polymorphism of the Angiotensin Converting Enzyme and L-dopa-induced Adverse Effects in Parkinson's Disease." Journal of the Neurological Sciences, vol. 252, no. 2, 2007, pp. 130-4.
Lin JJ, Yueh KC, Lin SZ, et al. Genetic polymorphism of the angiotensin converting enzyme and L-dopa-induced adverse effects in Parkinson's disease. J Neurol Sci. 2007;252(2):130-4.
Lin, J. J., Yueh, K. C., Lin, S. Z., Harn, H. J., & Liu, J. T. (2007). Genetic polymorphism of the angiotensin converting enzyme and L-dopa-induced adverse effects in Parkinson's disease. Journal of the Neurological Sciences, 252(2), 130-4.
Lin JJ, et al. Genetic Polymorphism of the Angiotensin Converting Enzyme and L-dopa-induced Adverse Effects in Parkinson's Disease. J Neurol Sci. 2007 Jan 31;252(2):130-4. PubMed PMID: 17196621.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Genetic polymorphism of the angiotensin converting enzyme and L-dopa-induced adverse effects in Parkinson's disease. AU - Lin,Juei-Jueng, AU - Yueh,Kuo-Chu, AU - Lin,Shinn-Zong, AU - Harn,Horng-Jyh, AU - Liu,Jung-Tung, Y1 - 2006/12/28/ PY - 2006/03/09/received PY - 2006/10/19/revised PY - 2006/10/30/accepted PY - 2007/1/2/pubmed PY - 2007/3/28/medline PY - 2007/1/2/entrez SP - 130 EP - 4 JF - Journal of the neurological sciences JO - J Neurol Sci VL - 252 IS - 2 N2 - There was increasing evidence suggesting that angiotensin I-converting enzyme may play an important role in the pathogenesis of PD. Our former study has shown that angiotensin I-converting enzyme gene (ACE) may confer a susceptibility for the risk of Parkinson's disease (PD). Meanwhile, recent studies have emphasized that genetic factors may involve in the occurrence of the adverse effects of chronic L-dopa therapy in PD patients. This study was designed to assess whether genetic polymorphism of the ACE could be a predictor of L-dopa-induced adverse effects in PD. There were 251 patients included in this study and their mean age at onset of disease was 63.3+/-11.4 years. The duration of disease and the treatment with L-dopa was 6.3+/-5.1 and 5.0+/-4.3 years, respectively. The frequency of the homozygote ACE-II genotype of the ACE in PD patients with L-dopa-induced psychosis was significantly higher than that in PD patients without the adverse effect (63.3% vs 43.0%; chi(2)=6.347, OR=1.435, 95%CI=1.105-1.864, p=0.012). However, the ACE polymorphism was not associated with the risk to develop dyskinesia or motor fluctuation induced by L-dopa. Furthermore, a logistic regression analysis confirmed that the ACE-II genotype was an independent risk factor for L-dopa-induced psychosis in PD patients (OR=2.542, p=0.012). In conclusion, results of the study showed that ACE-II genotype might confer a primary predictor for the occurrence of psychosis in L-dopa-treated PD. SN - 0022-510X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17196621/Genetic_polymorphism_of_the_angiotensin_converting_enzyme_and_L_dopa_induced_adverse_effects_in_Parkinson's_disease_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022-510X(06)00499-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -