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Cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase prolongs lifespan and attenuates ageing-induced cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction and protein damage.
Clin Exp Pharmacol Physiol. 2007 Jan-Feb; 34(1-2):81-7.CE

Abstract

1. Oxidative stress plays a role in senescence-associated organ deterioration. This is supported by the beneficial effects of anti-oxidants against ageing-related organ damage, although their role in cardiac ageing has not been elucidated. 2. The aim of the present study was to examine the impact of cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase, an enzyme for H(2)O(2) detoxification, on cardiac contractile function and protein damage in young (3-4 months) and old (26-28 months) male mice. Lifespan was analysed using the Kaplan-Meier survival curve. Cardiomyocyte contractile indices at various stimulus frequencies (0.1-5.0 Hz) were analysed, including peak shortening (PS), time to 90% PS, time to 90% relengthening (TR(90)) and maximal velocity of shortening/relengthening (+/-dL/dt). Protein damage was assessed using protein carbonyl formation. Catalase transgenic mice showed longer lifespan than wild-type FVB mice. The catalase transgene itself did not alter bodyweight or organ weight, or myocyte function. Ageing depressed +/-dL/dt and prolonged TR(90), but had no effect on other indices in FVB mice. Increased frequency triggered decreases in PS amplitude were exaggerated in aged FVB myocytes. Interestingly, ageing-induced mechanical defects were significantly attenuated in myocytes from catalase mice. Protein carbonyl formation was elevated in aged FVB compared with young FVB mice, which was significantly diminished in catalase mice. The proteomes of the myocardium of young or old FVB and catalase mice were compared using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Six proteins with differential expression between young and old FVB groups were tentatively identified, some of which were reversed by catalase. 3. In summary, the present data suggest that catalase protects cardiomyocytes from ageing-induced contractile defects and protein damage.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Pharmaceutical Sciences & Center for Cardiovascular Research and Alternative Medicine, University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming 82071-3375, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17201740

Citation

Wu, Shan, et al. "Cardiac-specific Overexpression of Catalase Prolongs Lifespan and Attenuates Ageing-induced Cardiomyocyte Contractile Dysfunction and Protein Damage." Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology & Physiology, vol. 34, no. 1-2, 2007, pp. 81-7.
Wu S, Li Q, Du M, et al. Cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase prolongs lifespan and attenuates ageing-induced cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction and protein damage. Clin Exp Pharmacol Physiol. 2007;34(1-2):81-7.
Wu, S., Li, Q., Du, M., Li, S. Y., & Ren, J. (2007). Cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase prolongs lifespan and attenuates ageing-induced cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction and protein damage. Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology & Physiology, 34(1-2), 81-7.
Wu S, et al. Cardiac-specific Overexpression of Catalase Prolongs Lifespan and Attenuates Ageing-induced Cardiomyocyte Contractile Dysfunction and Protein Damage. Clin Exp Pharmacol Physiol. 2007 Jan-Feb;34(1-2):81-7. PubMed PMID: 17201740.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase prolongs lifespan and attenuates ageing-induced cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction and protein damage. AU - Wu,Shan, AU - Li,Qun, AU - Du,Min, AU - Li,Shi-Yan, AU - Ren,Jun, PY - 2007/1/5/pubmed PY - 2007/3/29/medline PY - 2007/1/5/entrez SP - 81 EP - 7 JF - Clinical and experimental pharmacology & physiology JO - Clin Exp Pharmacol Physiol VL - 34 IS - 1-2 N2 - 1. Oxidative stress plays a role in senescence-associated organ deterioration. This is supported by the beneficial effects of anti-oxidants against ageing-related organ damage, although their role in cardiac ageing has not been elucidated. 2. The aim of the present study was to examine the impact of cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase, an enzyme for H(2)O(2) detoxification, on cardiac contractile function and protein damage in young (3-4 months) and old (26-28 months) male mice. Lifespan was analysed using the Kaplan-Meier survival curve. Cardiomyocyte contractile indices at various stimulus frequencies (0.1-5.0 Hz) were analysed, including peak shortening (PS), time to 90% PS, time to 90% relengthening (TR(90)) and maximal velocity of shortening/relengthening (+/-dL/dt). Protein damage was assessed using protein carbonyl formation. Catalase transgenic mice showed longer lifespan than wild-type FVB mice. The catalase transgene itself did not alter bodyweight or organ weight, or myocyte function. Ageing depressed +/-dL/dt and prolonged TR(90), but had no effect on other indices in FVB mice. Increased frequency triggered decreases in PS amplitude were exaggerated in aged FVB myocytes. Interestingly, ageing-induced mechanical defects were significantly attenuated in myocytes from catalase mice. Protein carbonyl formation was elevated in aged FVB compared with young FVB mice, which was significantly diminished in catalase mice. The proteomes of the myocardium of young or old FVB and catalase mice were compared using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Six proteins with differential expression between young and old FVB groups were tentatively identified, some of which were reversed by catalase. 3. In summary, the present data suggest that catalase protects cardiomyocytes from ageing-induced contractile defects and protein damage. SN - 0305-1870 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17201740/Cardiac_specific_overexpression_of_catalase_prolongs_lifespan_and_attenuates_ageing_induced_cardiomyocyte_contractile_dysfunction_and_protein_damage_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1440-1681.2007.04540.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -