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Yeast genomic expression patterns in response to low-shear modeled microgravity.
BMC Genomics. 2007 Jan 03; 8:3.BG

Abstract

The low-shear microgravity environment, modeled by rotating suspension culture bioreactors called high aspect ratio vessels (HARVs), allows investigation in ground-based studies of the effects of microgravity on eukaryotic cells and provides insights into the impact of space flight on cellular physiology. We have previously demonstrated that low-shear modeled microgravity (LSMMG) causes significant phenotypic changes of a select group of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes associated with the establishment of cell polarity, bipolar budding, and cell separation. However, the mechanisms cells utilize to sense and respond to microgravity and the fundamental gene expression changes that occur are largely unknown. In this study, we examined the global transcriptional response of yeast cells grown under LSMMG conditions using DNA microarray analysis in order to determine if exposure to LSMMG results in changes in gene expression.

RESULTS

LSMMG differentially changed the expression of a significant number of genes (1372) when yeast cells were cultured for either five generations or twenty-five generations in HARVs, as compared to cells grown under identical conditions in normal gravity. We identified genes in cell wall integrity signaling pathways containing MAP kinase cascades that may provide clues to novel physiological responses of eukaryotic cells to the external stress of a low-shear modeled microgravity environment. A comparison of the microgravity response to other environmental stress response (ESR) genes showed that 26% of the genes that respond significantly to LSMMG are involved in a general environmental stress response, while 74% of the genes may represent a unique transcriptional response to microgravity. In addition, we found changes in genes involved in budding, cell polarity establishment, and cell separation that validate our hypothesis that phenotypic changes observed in cells grown in microgravity are reflected in genome-wide changes. This study documents a considerable response to yeast cell growth in low-shear modeled microgravity that is evident, at least in part, by changes in gene expression. Notably, we identified genes that are involved in cell signaling pathways that allow cells to detect environmental changes, to respond within the cell, and to change accordingly, as well as genes of unknown function that may have a unique transcriptional response to microgravity. We also uncovered significant changes in the expression of many genes involved in cell polarization and bud formation that correlate well with the phenotypic effects observed in yeast cells when grown under similar conditions. These results are noteworthy as they have implications for human space flight.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Health Sciences, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717, USA. Kathy.Sheehan@colorado.edu <Kathy.Sheehan@colorado.edu>No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17201921

Citation

Sheehan, Kathy B., et al. "Yeast Genomic Expression Patterns in Response to Low-shear Modeled Microgravity." BMC Genomics, vol. 8, 2007, p. 3.
Sheehan KB, McInnerney K, Purevdorj-Gage B, et al. Yeast genomic expression patterns in response to low-shear modeled microgravity. BMC Genomics. 2007;8:3.
Sheehan, K. B., McInnerney, K., Purevdorj-Gage, B., Altenburg, S. D., & Hyman, L. E. (2007). Yeast genomic expression patterns in response to low-shear modeled microgravity. BMC Genomics, 8, 3.
Sheehan KB, et al. Yeast Genomic Expression Patterns in Response to Low-shear Modeled Microgravity. BMC Genomics. 2007 Jan 3;8:3. PubMed PMID: 17201921.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Yeast genomic expression patterns in response to low-shear modeled microgravity. AU - Sheehan,Kathy B, AU - McInnerney,Kate, AU - Purevdorj-Gage,Boloroo, AU - Altenburg,Sara D, AU - Hyman,Linda E, Y1 - 2007/01/03/ PY - 2006/01/27/received PY - 2007/01/03/accepted PY - 2007/1/5/pubmed PY - 2007/3/14/medline PY - 2007/1/5/entrez SP - 3 EP - 3 JF - BMC genomics JO - BMC Genomics VL - 8 N2 - UNLABELLED: The low-shear microgravity environment, modeled by rotating suspension culture bioreactors called high aspect ratio vessels (HARVs), allows investigation in ground-based studies of the effects of microgravity on eukaryotic cells and provides insights into the impact of space flight on cellular physiology. We have previously demonstrated that low-shear modeled microgravity (LSMMG) causes significant phenotypic changes of a select group of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes associated with the establishment of cell polarity, bipolar budding, and cell separation. However, the mechanisms cells utilize to sense and respond to microgravity and the fundamental gene expression changes that occur are largely unknown. In this study, we examined the global transcriptional response of yeast cells grown under LSMMG conditions using DNA microarray analysis in order to determine if exposure to LSMMG results in changes in gene expression. RESULTS: LSMMG differentially changed the expression of a significant number of genes (1372) when yeast cells were cultured for either five generations or twenty-five generations in HARVs, as compared to cells grown under identical conditions in normal gravity. We identified genes in cell wall integrity signaling pathways containing MAP kinase cascades that may provide clues to novel physiological responses of eukaryotic cells to the external stress of a low-shear modeled microgravity environment. A comparison of the microgravity response to other environmental stress response (ESR) genes showed that 26% of the genes that respond significantly to LSMMG are involved in a general environmental stress response, while 74% of the genes may represent a unique transcriptional response to microgravity. In addition, we found changes in genes involved in budding, cell polarity establishment, and cell separation that validate our hypothesis that phenotypic changes observed in cells grown in microgravity are reflected in genome-wide changes. This study documents a considerable response to yeast cell growth in low-shear modeled microgravity that is evident, at least in part, by changes in gene expression. Notably, we identified genes that are involved in cell signaling pathways that allow cells to detect environmental changes, to respond within the cell, and to change accordingly, as well as genes of unknown function that may have a unique transcriptional response to microgravity. We also uncovered significant changes in the expression of many genes involved in cell polarization and bud formation that correlate well with the phenotypic effects observed in yeast cells when grown under similar conditions. These results are noteworthy as they have implications for human space flight. SN - 1471-2164 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17201921/Yeast_genomic_expression_patterns_in_response_to_low_shear_modeled_microgravity_ L2 - https://bmcgenomics.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-2164-8-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -