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Effect of vitamin E on aminotransferase levels and insulin resistance in children with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.
Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2006 Dec; 24(11-12):1553-61.AP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Few data are available on the effect of antioxidants in paediatric non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

AIM

To compare the effect of a nutritional programme alone or combined with alpha-tocopherol and ascorbic acid on alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels, and insulin resistance (IR) in biopsy-proven NAFLD children.

METHODS

IN a 12-month double-blind placebo study, 90 patients were prescribed a balanced calorie diet (25-30 cal/kg/d), physical exercise, and placebo (group A) or alpha-tocopherol 600 IU/day plus ascorbic acid 500 mg/day (group B). IR was estimated by the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR).

RESULTS

At month 12, ALT (32.67 +/- 8.09 vs. 32.18 +/- 11.39 IU/L; P = NS), HOMA-IR (1.52 +/- 0.66 vs. 1.84 +/- 0.95 IU/L; P = NS), and weight loss (32% vs. 35% of excessive body weight; P = NS) did not differ between the two arms. Among subjects who lost >or=20% of their excessive weight, ALT and body weight percentage changes were significantly related (r(o) = 0.260; P = 0.03). In subjects, who lost more than 1.0 kg, HOMA-IR significantly decreased (2.20 +/- 0.21 to 1.57 +/- 0.13 in group A (P <or= 0.01; -8%); 2.91 +/- 0.24 to 1.88 +/- 0.16 in group B (-32%; P <or= 0.0001)). ALT decreased by 36% (59.13 +/- 4.11 vs. 30.27 +/- 1.46 IU/L; P <or= 0.001), and 42% (68.19 +/- 5.68 vs. 31.92 +/- 1.92 IU/L; P <or= 0.0001). In a multivariate analysis, fasting insulin changes in group A (P = 0.012; F = 7.150).

CONCLUSIONS

Diet and physical exercise in NAFLD children seem to lead to a significant improvement of liver function and glucose metabolism beyond any antioxidant therapy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Liver Unit, Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital and Research Institute, Rome, Italy.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17206944

Citation

Nobili, V, et al. "Effect of Vitamin E On Aminotransferase Levels and Insulin Resistance in Children With Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease." Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, vol. 24, no. 11-12, 2006, pp. 1553-61.
Nobili V, Manco M, Devito R, et al. Effect of vitamin E on aminotransferase levels and insulin resistance in children with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2006;24(11-12):1553-61.
Nobili, V., Manco, M., Devito, R., Ciampalini, P., Piemonte, F., & Marcellini, M. (2006). Effect of vitamin E on aminotransferase levels and insulin resistance in children with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, 24(11-12), 1553-61.
Nobili V, et al. Effect of Vitamin E On Aminotransferase Levels and Insulin Resistance in Children With Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2006;24(11-12):1553-61. PubMed PMID: 17206944.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of vitamin E on aminotransferase levels and insulin resistance in children with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. AU - Nobili,V, AU - Manco,M, AU - Devito,R, AU - Ciampalini,P, AU - Piemonte,F, AU - Marcellini,M, PY - 2007/1/9/pubmed PY - 2007/6/8/medline PY - 2007/1/9/entrez SP - 1553 EP - 61 JF - Alimentary pharmacology & therapeutics JO - Aliment Pharmacol Ther VL - 24 IS - 11-12 N2 - BACKGROUND: Few data are available on the effect of antioxidants in paediatric non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). AIM: To compare the effect of a nutritional programme alone or combined with alpha-tocopherol and ascorbic acid on alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels, and insulin resistance (IR) in biopsy-proven NAFLD children. METHODS: IN a 12-month double-blind placebo study, 90 patients were prescribed a balanced calorie diet (25-30 cal/kg/d), physical exercise, and placebo (group A) or alpha-tocopherol 600 IU/day plus ascorbic acid 500 mg/day (group B). IR was estimated by the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR). RESULTS: At month 12, ALT (32.67 +/- 8.09 vs. 32.18 +/- 11.39 IU/L; P = NS), HOMA-IR (1.52 +/- 0.66 vs. 1.84 +/- 0.95 IU/L; P = NS), and weight loss (32% vs. 35% of excessive body weight; P = NS) did not differ between the two arms. Among subjects who lost >or=20% of their excessive weight, ALT and body weight percentage changes were significantly related (r(o) = 0.260; P = 0.03). In subjects, who lost more than 1.0 kg, HOMA-IR significantly decreased (2.20 +/- 0.21 to 1.57 +/- 0.13 in group A (P <or= 0.01; -8%); 2.91 +/- 0.24 to 1.88 +/- 0.16 in group B (-32%; P <or= 0.0001)). ALT decreased by 36% (59.13 +/- 4.11 vs. 30.27 +/- 1.46 IU/L; P <or= 0.001), and 42% (68.19 +/- 5.68 vs. 31.92 +/- 1.92 IU/L; P <or= 0.0001). In a multivariate analysis, fasting insulin changes in group A (P = 0.012; F = 7.150). CONCLUSIONS: Diet and physical exercise in NAFLD children seem to lead to a significant improvement of liver function and glucose metabolism beyond any antioxidant therapy. SN - 0269-2813 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17206944/Effect_of_vitamin_E_on_aminotransferase_levels_and_insulin_resistance_in_children_with_non_alcoholic_fatty_liver_disease_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2036.2006.03161.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -