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CSF and MRI markers independently contribute to the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.
Neurobiol Aging. 2008 May; 29(5):669-75.NA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Decreased amyloid beta (1-42) (Abeta42) and increased (phosphorylated) tau in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are considered to be a reflection of plaques, tangles, and neuronal degeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Atrophy of the medial temporal lobe (MTA) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) reflects neuronal loss in this area.

OBJECTIVE

To compare diagnostic accuracy of CSF biomarkers and MTA in AD versus controls.

METHODS

Abeta42, tau and tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 (Ptau-181) were measured in CSF from 61 AD patients and 32 controls by sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A CSF biomarker profile for AD was constructed. MTA was rated visually on MRI.

RESULTS

When AD patients and controls were evaluated separately, no correlations were present between the CSF markers and MTA score. Both MTA and CSF biomarker profile were independently associated with the diagnosis AD (MTA: OR (95% CI)=28 (3-239); CSF biomarker profile: OR (95% CI)=57 (13-262)). Among individuals younger than 65 years old and without MTA 60% suffered AD, and the finding of an abnormal CSF biomarker profile was limited to AD patients only.

CONCLUSIONS

MTA and CSF biomarkers seem to be of incremental value for the diagnosis AD. CSF analysis is most sensitive in the absence of MTA, and especially among early-onset AD patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurology, Alzheimer Center, VU University Medical Center, 1081 HV Amsterdam, The Netherlands. niki.schoonenboom@vumc.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Evaluation Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17208336

Citation

Schoonenboom, Niki S M., et al. "CSF and MRI Markers Independently Contribute to the Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease." Neurobiology of Aging, vol. 29, no. 5, 2008, pp. 669-75.
Schoonenboom NS, van der Flier WM, Blankenstein MA, et al. CSF and MRI markers independently contribute to the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Neurobiol Aging. 2008;29(5):669-75.
Schoonenboom, N. S., van der Flier, W. M., Blankenstein, M. A., Bouwman, F. H., Van Kamp, G. J., Barkhof, F., & Scheltens, P. (2008). CSF and MRI markers independently contribute to the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Neurobiology of Aging, 29(5), 669-75.
Schoonenboom NS, et al. CSF and MRI Markers Independently Contribute to the Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease. Neurobiol Aging. 2008;29(5):669-75. PubMed PMID: 17208336.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - CSF and MRI markers independently contribute to the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. AU - Schoonenboom,Niki S M, AU - van der Flier,Wiesje M, AU - Blankenstein,Marinus A, AU - Bouwman,Femke H, AU - Van Kamp,Gerard J, AU - Barkhof,Frederik, AU - Scheltens,Philip, Y1 - 2007/01/17/ PY - 2006/05/12/received PY - 2006/11/17/revised PY - 2006/11/25/accepted PY - 2007/1/9/pubmed PY - 2008/4/29/medline PY - 2007/1/9/entrez SP - 669 EP - 75 JF - Neurobiology of aging JO - Neurobiol Aging VL - 29 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Decreased amyloid beta (1-42) (Abeta42) and increased (phosphorylated) tau in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are considered to be a reflection of plaques, tangles, and neuronal degeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Atrophy of the medial temporal lobe (MTA) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) reflects neuronal loss in this area. OBJECTIVE: To compare diagnostic accuracy of CSF biomarkers and MTA in AD versus controls. METHODS: Abeta42, tau and tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 (Ptau-181) were measured in CSF from 61 AD patients and 32 controls by sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A CSF biomarker profile for AD was constructed. MTA was rated visually on MRI. RESULTS: When AD patients and controls were evaluated separately, no correlations were present between the CSF markers and MTA score. Both MTA and CSF biomarker profile were independently associated with the diagnosis AD (MTA: OR (95% CI)=28 (3-239); CSF biomarker profile: OR (95% CI)=57 (13-262)). Among individuals younger than 65 years old and without MTA 60% suffered AD, and the finding of an abnormal CSF biomarker profile was limited to AD patients only. CONCLUSIONS: MTA and CSF biomarkers seem to be of incremental value for the diagnosis AD. CSF analysis is most sensitive in the absence of MTA, and especially among early-onset AD patients. SN - 1558-1497 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17208336/CSF_and_MRI_markers_independently_contribute_to_the_diagnosis_of_Alzheimer's_disease_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0197-4580(06)00440-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -