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Probiotic supplementation for the first 6 months of life fails to reduce the risk of atopic dermatitis and increases the risk of allergen sensitization in high-risk children: a randomized controlled trial.
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2007 Jan; 119(1):184-91.JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Despite preliminary evidence, the role of probiotics in allergy prevention is unclear.

OBJECTIVE

To determine whether early probiotic supplementation prevents allergic disease in high-risk infants.

METHODS

Newborns of women with allergy (n = 231) received either Lactobacillus acidophilus (LAVRI-A1) or placebo daily for the first 6 months of life. Children were assessed for atopic dermatitis (AD) and other symptoms at 6 and 12 months and had allergen skin prick tests (SPT) at 12 months of age.

RESULTS

A total of 178 infants completed the supplementation period. Those in the probiotic group showed significantly higher rates of Lactobacillus colonization (P = .039). At 6 months, AD rates were similar in the probiotic (n = 23/89; 25.8%) and placebo (n = 20/88; 22.7%) groups (P = .629). There was also no difference at 12 months, although the proportion of children with SPT+AD was significantly higher in the probiotic group (P = .045). At 12 months, the rate of sensitization was significantly higher in the probiotic group (P = .030). The presence of culturable Lactobacilli or Bifidobacterium in stools in the first month of life was not associated with the risk of subsequent sensitization or disease; however, the presence of Lactobacillus at 6 months of age was associated with increased risk of subsequent cow's milk sensitization (P = .012).

CONCLUSION

Early probiotic supplementation with L acidophilus did not reduce the risk of AD in high-risk infants and was associated with increased allergen sensitization in infants receiving supplements. The long-term significance of the increased rate of sensitization needs to be investigated in further studies.

CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS

These findings challenge the role of probiotics in allergy prevention.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Paediatrics and Child Health, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17208600

Citation

Taylor, Angie L., et al. "Probiotic Supplementation for the First 6 Months of Life Fails to Reduce the Risk of Atopic Dermatitis and Increases the Risk of Allergen Sensitization in High-risk Children: a Randomized Controlled Trial." The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, vol. 119, no. 1, 2007, pp. 184-91.
Taylor AL, Dunstan JA, Prescott SL. Probiotic supplementation for the first 6 months of life fails to reduce the risk of atopic dermatitis and increases the risk of allergen sensitization in high-risk children: a randomized controlled trial. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2007;119(1):184-91.
Taylor, A. L., Dunstan, J. A., & Prescott, S. L. (2007). Probiotic supplementation for the first 6 months of life fails to reduce the risk of atopic dermatitis and increases the risk of allergen sensitization in high-risk children: a randomized controlled trial. The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 119(1), 184-91.
Taylor AL, Dunstan JA, Prescott SL. Probiotic Supplementation for the First 6 Months of Life Fails to Reduce the Risk of Atopic Dermatitis and Increases the Risk of Allergen Sensitization in High-risk Children: a Randomized Controlled Trial. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2007;119(1):184-91. PubMed PMID: 17208600.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Probiotic supplementation for the first 6 months of life fails to reduce the risk of atopic dermatitis and increases the risk of allergen sensitization in high-risk children: a randomized controlled trial. AU - Taylor,Angie L, AU - Dunstan,Janet A, AU - Prescott,Susan L, Y1 - 2006/10/13/ PY - 2006/05/31/received PY - 2006/08/25/revised PY - 2006/08/29/accepted PY - 2007/1/9/pubmed PY - 2007/3/14/medline PY - 2007/1/9/entrez SP - 184 EP - 91 JF - The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology JO - J. Allergy Clin. Immunol. VL - 119 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Despite preliminary evidence, the role of probiotics in allergy prevention is unclear. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether early probiotic supplementation prevents allergic disease in high-risk infants. METHODS: Newborns of women with allergy (n = 231) received either Lactobacillus acidophilus (LAVRI-A1) or placebo daily for the first 6 months of life. Children were assessed for atopic dermatitis (AD) and other symptoms at 6 and 12 months and had allergen skin prick tests (SPT) at 12 months of age. RESULTS: A total of 178 infants completed the supplementation period. Those in the probiotic group showed significantly higher rates of Lactobacillus colonization (P = .039). At 6 months, AD rates were similar in the probiotic (n = 23/89; 25.8%) and placebo (n = 20/88; 22.7%) groups (P = .629). There was also no difference at 12 months, although the proportion of children with SPT+AD was significantly higher in the probiotic group (P = .045). At 12 months, the rate of sensitization was significantly higher in the probiotic group (P = .030). The presence of culturable Lactobacilli or Bifidobacterium in stools in the first month of life was not associated with the risk of subsequent sensitization or disease; however, the presence of Lactobacillus at 6 months of age was associated with increased risk of subsequent cow's milk sensitization (P = .012). CONCLUSION: Early probiotic supplementation with L acidophilus did not reduce the risk of AD in high-risk infants and was associated with increased allergen sensitization in infants receiving supplements. The long-term significance of the increased rate of sensitization needs to be investigated in further studies. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: These findings challenge the role of probiotics in allergy prevention. SN - 0091-6749 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17208600/Probiotic_supplementation_for_the_first_6_months_of_life_fails_to_reduce_the_risk_of_atopic_dermatitis_and_increases_the_risk_of_allergen_sensitization_in_high_risk_children:_a_randomized_controlled_trial_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0091-6749(06)01798-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -