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Gender and socio-economic differences in BMI of secondary high school students in Ho Chi Minh city.
Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2007; 16(1):74-83.AP

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess the nutritional status of adolescents in Ho Chi Minh City, and in particular determine the prevalence of overweight and obesity in adolescents across different sub groups, based on gender, household economic status and geographic location.

DESIGN

A cross-sectional survey based on a two-stage cluster sampling design.

SETTING

Secondary high schools in Ho Chi Minh City.

SUBJECTS

There were 1504 adolescents involved in the study, of which 50% were girls and the mean age of participants was 13.1 years.

RESULTS

Overall, 4.9% of the students were overweight and 0.6% were obese, while 13.1% of the students were underweight. The prevalence of underweight was significantly higher in boys than girls (p=0.001) and overweight and obesity were also higher in boys although these differences were not statistically significant (p=0.074). There was a much higher prevalence of overweight and obesity in students from schools in wealthy urban districts (8.2% and 0.6%, respectively) in comparison to students from schools in rural or semi-rural districts (1.6% and 0.2%, respectively) and these differences were statistically significant (p<0.001).

CONCLUSIONS

A transition in nutritional status is underway in this population of adolescents where overweight and obesity are emerging as a public health problem, but underweight remains a significant problem.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Community Health, University Training Centre for Health Care Professionals, 520 Nguyen Tri Phuong, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. hongutc@yahoo.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17215183

Citation

Tang, Hong K., et al. "Gender and Socio-economic Differences in BMI of Secondary High School Students in Ho Chi Minh City." Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 16, no. 1, 2007, pp. 74-83.
Tang HK, Dibley MJ, Sibbritt D, et al. Gender and socio-economic differences in BMI of secondary high school students in Ho Chi Minh city. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2007;16(1):74-83.
Tang, H. K., Dibley, M. J., Sibbritt, D., & Tran, H. M. (2007). Gender and socio-economic differences in BMI of secondary high school students in Ho Chi Minh city. Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 16(1), 74-83.
Tang HK, et al. Gender and Socio-economic Differences in BMI of Secondary High School Students in Ho Chi Minh City. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2007;16(1):74-83. PubMed PMID: 17215183.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Gender and socio-economic differences in BMI of secondary high school students in Ho Chi Minh city. AU - Tang,Hong K, AU - Dibley,Michael J, AU - Sibbritt,David, AU - Tran,Hanh Mt, PY - 2007/1/12/pubmed PY - 2007/5/1/medline PY - 2007/1/12/entrez SP - 74 EP - 83 JF - Asia Pacific journal of clinical nutrition JO - Asia Pac J Clin Nutr VL - 16 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To assess the nutritional status of adolescents in Ho Chi Minh City, and in particular determine the prevalence of overweight and obesity in adolescents across different sub groups, based on gender, household economic status and geographic location. DESIGN: A cross-sectional survey based on a two-stage cluster sampling design. SETTING: Secondary high schools in Ho Chi Minh City. SUBJECTS: There were 1504 adolescents involved in the study, of which 50% were girls and the mean age of participants was 13.1 years. RESULTS: Overall, 4.9% of the students were overweight and 0.6% were obese, while 13.1% of the students were underweight. The prevalence of underweight was significantly higher in boys than girls (p=0.001) and overweight and obesity were also higher in boys although these differences were not statistically significant (p=0.074). There was a much higher prevalence of overweight and obesity in students from schools in wealthy urban districts (8.2% and 0.6%, respectively) in comparison to students from schools in rural or semi-rural districts (1.6% and 0.2%, respectively) and these differences were statistically significant (p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: A transition in nutritional status is underway in this population of adolescents where overweight and obesity are emerging as a public health problem, but underweight remains a significant problem. SN - 0964-7058 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17215183/Gender_and_socio_economic_differences_in_BMI_of_secondary_high_school_students_in_Ho_Chi_Minh_city_ L2 - http://apjcn.nhri.org.tw/server/APJCN/16/1/74.pdf DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -