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Smoking, hypertension, alcohol consumption, and risk of abdominal aortic aneurysm in men.

Abstract

Despite the known protective association between moderate alcohol consumption and ischemic heart disease, little is known about the effects of alcohol consumption on abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). The authors analyzed prospective, biennially updated data for a cohort of 39,352 US men from 1986 to 2002. The association of incident AAA diagnosis with alcohol consumption in grams per day was assessed at baseline and by using alcohol consumption data updated every 4 years, controlling for previously reported cardiovascular risk factors. During 576,374 person-years of follow-up, 376 newly diagnosed cases of AAA were demonstrated. After adjustment for other risk factors for AAA, including smoking, hypertension, and body mass index, alcohol consumption at baseline was independently associated with AAA diagnosis (p for trend = 0.03), with a maximum hazard ratio of 1.21 (95% confidence interval: 0.78, 1.87) for > or =30.0 g (approximately > or =2 standard drinks) of daily alcohol consumption. This association was stronger when the updated alcohol consumption data were assessed rather than simply baseline exposure (p for trend = 0.02); the hazard ratio for the highest level of intake (> or =30.0 g/day) was 1.65 (95% confidence interval: 1.03, 2.64). Small numbers limited analyses by beverage type, but liquor demonstrated the strongest positive association with AAA.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

    ,

    Source

    American journal of epidemiology 165:7 2007 Apr 01 pg 838-45

    MeSH

    Adult
    Aged
    Alcohol Drinking
    Alcoholic Beverages
    Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal
    Chi-Square Distribution
    Humans
    Hypertension
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Prospective Studies
    Risk Factors
    Smoking
    Surveys and Questionnaires

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    17215382

    Citation

    Wong, Daniel R., et al. "Smoking, Hypertension, Alcohol Consumption, and Risk of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in Men." American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 165, no. 7, 2007, pp. 838-45.
    Wong DR, Willett WC, Rimm EB. Smoking, hypertension, alcohol consumption, and risk of abdominal aortic aneurysm in men. Am J Epidemiol. 2007;165(7):838-45.
    Wong, D. R., Willett, W. C., & Rimm, E. B. (2007). Smoking, hypertension, alcohol consumption, and risk of abdominal aortic aneurysm in men. American Journal of Epidemiology, 165(7), pp. 838-45.
    Wong DR, Willett WC, Rimm EB. Smoking, Hypertension, Alcohol Consumption, and Risk of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in Men. Am J Epidemiol. 2007 Apr 1;165(7):838-45. PubMed PMID: 17215382.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Smoking, hypertension, alcohol consumption, and risk of abdominal aortic aneurysm in men. AU - Wong,Daniel R, AU - Willett,Walter C, AU - Rimm,Eric B, Y1 - 2007/01/10/ PY - 2007/1/12/pubmed PY - 2007/5/4/medline PY - 2007/1/12/entrez SP - 838 EP - 45 JF - American journal of epidemiology JO - Am. J. Epidemiol. VL - 165 IS - 7 N2 - Despite the known protective association between moderate alcohol consumption and ischemic heart disease, little is known about the effects of alcohol consumption on abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). The authors analyzed prospective, biennially updated data for a cohort of 39,352 US men from 1986 to 2002. The association of incident AAA diagnosis with alcohol consumption in grams per day was assessed at baseline and by using alcohol consumption data updated every 4 years, controlling for previously reported cardiovascular risk factors. During 576,374 person-years of follow-up, 376 newly diagnosed cases of AAA were demonstrated. After adjustment for other risk factors for AAA, including smoking, hypertension, and body mass index, alcohol consumption at baseline was independently associated with AAA diagnosis (p for trend = 0.03), with a maximum hazard ratio of 1.21 (95% confidence interval: 0.78, 1.87) for > or =30.0 g (approximately > or =2 standard drinks) of daily alcohol consumption. This association was stronger when the updated alcohol consumption data were assessed rather than simply baseline exposure (p for trend = 0.02); the hazard ratio for the highest level of intake (> or =30.0 g/day) was 1.65 (95% confidence interval: 1.03, 2.64). Small numbers limited analyses by beverage type, but liquor demonstrated the strongest positive association with AAA. SN - 0002-9262 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17215382/Smoking_hypertension_alcohol_consumption_and_risk_of_abdominal_aortic_aneurysm_in_men_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/aje/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/aje/kwk063 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -