Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

A prospective study of periodontal disease and pancreatic cancer in US male health professionals.

Abstract

Two previous cohort studies reported positive associations between tooth loss or periodontitis and pancreatic cancer risk. Data on periodontal disease were obtained at baseline and every other year thereafter in a cohort of 51,529 male health professionals aged 40-75 years. A total of 216 patients were diagnosed with incident pancreatic cancer during 16 years of follow-up. Multivariable relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models controlling for potential confounders, including detailed smoking history. All statistical tests were two-sided. Compared with no periodontal disease, history of periodontal disease was associated with increased pancreatic cancer risk (overall, multivariable RR = 1.64, 95% CI = 1.19 to 2.26; P = .002; crude incidence rates: 61 versus 25 per 100,000 person-years; among never smokers, multivariable RR = 2.09, 95% CI = 1.18 to 3.71; P = .01; crude incidence rates: 61 versus 19 per 100,000 person-years). In contrast, baseline number of natural teeth and cumulative tooth loss during follow-up were not strongly associated with pancreatic cancer. The association between periodontal disease and increased risk of pancreatic cancer may occur through plausible biologic mechanisms, but confirmation of this association is necessary.

Links

  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Kresge 920, 677 Huntington Ave., Boston, MA 02115, USA. dmichaud@hsph.harvard.edu

    , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Adult
    Aged
    Follow-Up Studies
    Health Personnel
    Humans
    Incidence
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Pancreatic Neoplasms
    Periodontal Diseases
    Periodontitis
    Prospective Studies
    Risk Assessment
    Risk Factors
    Severity of Illness Index
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    Tooth Loss
    United States

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    17228001

    Citation

    Michaud, Dominique S., et al. "A Prospective Study of Periodontal Disease and Pancreatic Cancer in US Male Health Professionals." Journal of the National Cancer Institute, vol. 99, no. 2, 2007, pp. 171-5.
    Michaud DS, Joshipura K, Giovannucci E, et al. A prospective study of periodontal disease and pancreatic cancer in US male health professionals. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2007;99(2):171-5.
    Michaud, D. S., Joshipura, K., Giovannucci, E., & Fuchs, C. S. (2007). A prospective study of periodontal disease and pancreatic cancer in US male health professionals. Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 99(2), pp. 171-5.
    Michaud DS, et al. A Prospective Study of Periodontal Disease and Pancreatic Cancer in US Male Health Professionals. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2007 Jan 17;99(2):171-5. PubMed PMID: 17228001.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - A prospective study of periodontal disease and pancreatic cancer in US male health professionals. AU - Michaud,Dominique S, AU - Joshipura,Kaumudi, AU - Giovannucci,Edward, AU - Fuchs,Charles S, PY - 2007/1/18/pubmed PY - 2007/2/10/medline PY - 2007/1/18/entrez SP - 171 EP - 5 JF - Journal of the National Cancer Institute JO - J. Natl. Cancer Inst. VL - 99 IS - 2 N2 - Two previous cohort studies reported positive associations between tooth loss or periodontitis and pancreatic cancer risk. Data on periodontal disease were obtained at baseline and every other year thereafter in a cohort of 51,529 male health professionals aged 40-75 years. A total of 216 patients were diagnosed with incident pancreatic cancer during 16 years of follow-up. Multivariable relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models controlling for potential confounders, including detailed smoking history. All statistical tests were two-sided. Compared with no periodontal disease, history of periodontal disease was associated with increased pancreatic cancer risk (overall, multivariable RR = 1.64, 95% CI = 1.19 to 2.26; P = .002; crude incidence rates: 61 versus 25 per 100,000 person-years; among never smokers, multivariable RR = 2.09, 95% CI = 1.18 to 3.71; P = .01; crude incidence rates: 61 versus 19 per 100,000 person-years). In contrast, baseline number of natural teeth and cumulative tooth loss during follow-up were not strongly associated with pancreatic cancer. The association between periodontal disease and increased risk of pancreatic cancer may occur through plausible biologic mechanisms, but confirmation of this association is necessary. SN - 1460-2105 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17228001/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jnci/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jnci/djk021 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -