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Nut consumption and weight gain in a Mediterranean cohort: The SUN study.
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2007 Jan; 15(1):107-16.O

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess the association, in a Mediterranean population, between nut consumption and risk of weight gain (at least 5 kg) or the risk of becoming overweight/obese.

RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES

The Seguimiento Universidad de Navarra project is a prospective cohort of 8865 adult men and women who completed a follow-up questionnaire after a median of 28 months. Dietary habits were assessed with a previously validated semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaire.

RESULTS

Nine hundred thirty-seven participants reported a weight gain of > or =5 kg at follow-up. After adjusting for age, sex, smoking, leisure time physical activity, and other known risk factors for obesity, participants who ate nuts two or more times per week had a significantly lower risk of weight gain (odds ratio: 0.69; 95% confidence interval: 0.53 to 0.90, p for trend = 0.006) than those who never or almost never ate nuts. Participants with little nut consumption (never/almost never) gained an average of 424 grams (95% confidence interval: 102 to 746) more than frequent nut eaters. Nut consumption was not significantly associated with incident overweight/obesity in the cohort.

DISCUSSION

Frequent nut consumption was associated with a reduced risk of weight gain (5 kg or more). These results support the recommendation of nut consumption as an important component of a cardioprotective diet and also allay fears of possible weight gain.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Navarra, c/Irunlarrea, 1, 31008 Pamplona, Navarra, Spain. mbes@unav.esNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17228038

Citation

Bes-Rastrollo, Maira, et al. "Nut Consumption and Weight Gain in a Mediterranean Cohort: the SUN Study." Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.), vol. 15, no. 1, 2007, pp. 107-16.
Bes-Rastrollo M, Sabaté J, Gómez-Gracia E, et al. Nut consumption and weight gain in a Mediterranean cohort: The SUN study. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2007;15(1):107-16.
Bes-Rastrollo, M., Sabaté, J., Gómez-Gracia, E., Alonso, A., Martínez, J. A., & Martínez-González, M. A. (2007). Nut consumption and weight gain in a Mediterranean cohort: The SUN study. Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.), 15(1), 107-16.
Bes-Rastrollo M, et al. Nut Consumption and Weight Gain in a Mediterranean Cohort: the SUN Study. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2007;15(1):107-16. PubMed PMID: 17228038.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Nut consumption and weight gain in a Mediterranean cohort: The SUN study. AU - Bes-Rastrollo,Maira, AU - Sabaté,Joan, AU - Gómez-Gracia,Enrique, AU - Alonso,Alvaro, AU - Martínez,J Alfredo, AU - Martínez-González,Miguel Angel, PY - 2007/1/18/pubmed PY - 2007/3/21/medline PY - 2007/1/18/entrez SP - 107 EP - 16 JF - Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.) JO - Obesity (Silver Spring) VL - 15 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To assess the association, in a Mediterranean population, between nut consumption and risk of weight gain (at least 5 kg) or the risk of becoming overweight/obese. RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES: The Seguimiento Universidad de Navarra project is a prospective cohort of 8865 adult men and women who completed a follow-up questionnaire after a median of 28 months. Dietary habits were assessed with a previously validated semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaire. RESULTS: Nine hundred thirty-seven participants reported a weight gain of > or =5 kg at follow-up. After adjusting for age, sex, smoking, leisure time physical activity, and other known risk factors for obesity, participants who ate nuts two or more times per week had a significantly lower risk of weight gain (odds ratio: 0.69; 95% confidence interval: 0.53 to 0.90, p for trend = 0.006) than those who never or almost never ate nuts. Participants with little nut consumption (never/almost never) gained an average of 424 grams (95% confidence interval: 102 to 746) more than frequent nut eaters. Nut consumption was not significantly associated with incident overweight/obesity in the cohort. DISCUSSION: Frequent nut consumption was associated with a reduced risk of weight gain (5 kg or more). These results support the recommendation of nut consumption as an important component of a cardioprotective diet and also allay fears of possible weight gain. SN - 1930-7381 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17228038/Nut_consumption_and_weight_gain_in_a_Mediterranean_cohort:_The_SUN_study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/oby.2007.507 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -