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Spotted black snake (Pseudechis guttatus) envenoming.
Med J Aust. 2007 Jan 01; 186(1):41-2.MJ

Abstract

We report two cases of spotted black snake (Pseudechis guttatus) envenoming. One patient experienced localised burning pain around the bite and developed nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, upper abdominal cramping and diaphoresis. He was treated with intravenous fluids and antiemetics, but no antivenom, and was discharged 23 hours after the bite. The second patient developed a severe headache, blurred vision and mild nausea, associated with severe pain and swelling of the bitten limb that took 4 days to resolve. No antivenom was given and the patient had no sequelae. Neither patient developed significant coagulopathy, myolysis or neuromuscular paralysis. Bites by this species appear to cause effects similar to those of the more common red-bellied black snake (P. porphyriacus).

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Medical Practice and Population Health, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. gsbite@ferntree.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17229034

Citation

Jansen, Melanie, et al. "Spotted Black Snake (Pseudechis Guttatus) Envenoming." The Medical Journal of Australia, vol. 186, no. 1, 2007, pp. 41-2.
Jansen M, McLeod M, White J, et al. Spotted black snake (Pseudechis guttatus) envenoming. Med J Aust. 2007;186(1):41-2.
Jansen, M., McLeod, M., White, J., & Isbister, G. K. (2007). Spotted black snake (Pseudechis guttatus) envenoming. The Medical Journal of Australia, 186(1), 41-2.
Jansen M, et al. Spotted Black Snake (Pseudechis Guttatus) Envenoming. Med J Aust. 2007 Jan 1;186(1):41-2. PubMed PMID: 17229034.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Spotted black snake (Pseudechis guttatus) envenoming. AU - Jansen,Melanie, AU - McLeod,Monique, AU - White,Julian, AU - Isbister,Geoffrey K, PY - 2006/07/26/received PY - 2006/10/09/accepted PY - 2007/1/19/pubmed PY - 2007/2/9/medline PY - 2007/1/19/entrez SP - 41 EP - 2 JF - The Medical journal of Australia JO - Med. J. Aust. VL - 186 IS - 1 N2 - We report two cases of spotted black snake (Pseudechis guttatus) envenoming. One patient experienced localised burning pain around the bite and developed nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, upper abdominal cramping and diaphoresis. He was treated with intravenous fluids and antiemetics, but no antivenom, and was discharged 23 hours after the bite. The second patient developed a severe headache, blurred vision and mild nausea, associated with severe pain and swelling of the bitten limb that took 4 days to resolve. No antivenom was given and the patient had no sequelae. Neither patient developed significant coagulopathy, myolysis or neuromuscular paralysis. Bites by this species appear to cause effects similar to those of the more common red-bellied black snake (P. porphyriacus). SN - 0025-729X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17229034/Spotted_black_snake__Pseudechis_guttatus__envenoming_ L2 - https://www.mja.com.au/public/issues/186_01_010107/jan10788_fm.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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