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A survey of knowledge, attitude and practice of malaria management among pregnant women from two health care facilities in Nigeria.
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2007; 86(1):33-6.AO

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Malaria remains one of the most important causes of maternal and child morbidity and mortality in sub-Saharan Africa, despite the availability of effective interventions. The objective of this study was to assess the knowledge, attitude and practice of malaria management among pregnant women attending antenatal clinics in Nigeria.

METHODS

A cross-sectional study was undertaken on a sample of 867 pregnant women attending antenatal clinics in 2 health care facilities in Edo State, Nigeria, using a self-administered questionnaire.

RESULTS

Of the respondents, 87% said that they had undergone at least 1 episode of malaria during their current pregnancy. Most respondents (89%) attributed malaria to bites from infected mosquitoes, while 75% consider malaria an important health risk during pregnancy. However, knowledge of the consequences of malaria during pregnancy was poor, especially the risk posed to the fetus. Overall, the mean knowledge score on a scale of '0-7' was 3.5 (median 4.0). Respondents had poor belief in the effectiveness and use of insecticide-treated bed nets and intermittent preventive therapy, in preventing malaria during pregnancy.

CONCLUSIONS

This study has revealed that malaria is perceived as a common health problem among pregnant women attending these 2 health care facilities, and that knowledge, attitude and practice of its management is poor. Efforts should be made to improve anti-malarial intervention during pregnancy, to ensure that the goals of the Roll Back Malaria Initiative are achieved in Nigeria.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmacy Practice, University of Benin, Benin City, 300001, Nigeria. enatoefo@uniben.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17230286

Citation

Enato, Ehijie F O., et al. "A Survey of Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Malaria Management Among Pregnant Women From Two Health Care Facilities in Nigeria." Acta Obstetricia Et Gynecologica Scandinavica, vol. 86, no. 1, 2007, pp. 33-6.
Enato EF, Okhamafe AO, Okpere EE. A survey of knowledge, attitude and practice of malaria management among pregnant women from two health care facilities in Nigeria. Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2007;86(1):33-6.
Enato, E. F., Okhamafe, A. O., & Okpere, E. E. (2007). A survey of knowledge, attitude and practice of malaria management among pregnant women from two health care facilities in Nigeria. Acta Obstetricia Et Gynecologica Scandinavica, 86(1), 33-6.
Enato EF, Okhamafe AO, Okpere EE. A Survey of Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Malaria Management Among Pregnant Women From Two Health Care Facilities in Nigeria. Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2007;86(1):33-6. PubMed PMID: 17230286.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A survey of knowledge, attitude and practice of malaria management among pregnant women from two health care facilities in Nigeria. AU - Enato,Ehijie F O, AU - Okhamafe,Augustine O, AU - Okpere,Eugene E, PY - 2007/1/19/pubmed PY - 2007/2/16/medline PY - 2007/1/19/entrez SP - 33 EP - 6 JF - Acta obstetricia et gynecologica Scandinavica JO - Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand VL - 86 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Malaria remains one of the most important causes of maternal and child morbidity and mortality in sub-Saharan Africa, despite the availability of effective interventions. The objective of this study was to assess the knowledge, attitude and practice of malaria management among pregnant women attending antenatal clinics in Nigeria. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was undertaken on a sample of 867 pregnant women attending antenatal clinics in 2 health care facilities in Edo State, Nigeria, using a self-administered questionnaire. RESULTS: Of the respondents, 87% said that they had undergone at least 1 episode of malaria during their current pregnancy. Most respondents (89%) attributed malaria to bites from infected mosquitoes, while 75% consider malaria an important health risk during pregnancy. However, knowledge of the consequences of malaria during pregnancy was poor, especially the risk posed to the fetus. Overall, the mean knowledge score on a scale of '0-7' was 3.5 (median 4.0). Respondents had poor belief in the effectiveness and use of insecticide-treated bed nets and intermittent preventive therapy, in preventing malaria during pregnancy. CONCLUSIONS: This study has revealed that malaria is perceived as a common health problem among pregnant women attending these 2 health care facilities, and that knowledge, attitude and practice of its management is poor. Efforts should be made to improve anti-malarial intervention during pregnancy, to ensure that the goals of the Roll Back Malaria Initiative are achieved in Nigeria. SN - 0001-6349 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17230286/A_survey_of_knowledge_attitude_and_practice_of_malaria_management_among_pregnant_women_from_two_health_care_facilities_in_Nigeria_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1080/00016340600984670 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -