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Effects of high-fructose corn syrup and sucrose consumption on circulating glucose, insulin, leptin, and ghrelin and on appetite in normal-weight women.
Nutrition 2007; 23(2):103-12N

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Fructose has been implicated in obesity, partly due to lack of insulin-mediated leptin stimulation and ghrelin suppression. Most work has examined effects of pure fructose, rather than high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS), the most commonly consumed form of fructose. This study examined effects of beverages sweetened with HFCS or sucrose (Suc), when consumed with mixed meals, on blood glucose, insulin, leptin, ghrelin, and appetite.

METHODS

Thirty lean women were studied on two randomized 2-d visits during which HFCS- and Suc-sweetened beverages were consumed as 30% of energy on isocaloric diets during day 1 while blood was sampled. On day 2, food was eaten ad libitum. Subjects rated appetite at designated times throughout visits.

RESULTS

No significant differences between the two sweeteners were seen in fasting plasma glucose, insulin, leptin, and ghrelin (P > 0.05). The within-day variation in all four items was not different between the two visits (P > 0.05). Net areas under the curve were similar for glucose, insulin, and leptin (P > 0.05). There were no differences in energy or macronutrient intake on day 2. The only appetite variable that differed between sweeteners was desire to eat, which had a higher area under the curve the day after Suc compared with HFCS.

CONCLUSION

These short-term results suggest that, when fructose is consumed in the form of HFCS, the measured metabolic responses do not differ from Suc in lean women. Further research is required to examine appetite responses and to determine if these findings hold true for obese individuals, males, or longer periods.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, Rhode Island, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17234503

Citation

Melanson, Kathleen J., et al. "Effects of High-fructose Corn Syrup and Sucrose Consumption On Circulating Glucose, Insulin, Leptin, and Ghrelin and On Appetite in Normal-weight Women." Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.), vol. 23, no. 2, 2007, pp. 103-12.
Melanson KJ, Zukley L, Lowndes J, et al. Effects of high-fructose corn syrup and sucrose consumption on circulating glucose, insulin, leptin, and ghrelin and on appetite in normal-weight women. Nutrition. 2007;23(2):103-12.
Melanson, K. J., Zukley, L., Lowndes, J., Nguyen, V., Angelopoulos, T. J., & Rippe, J. M. (2007). Effects of high-fructose corn syrup and sucrose consumption on circulating glucose, insulin, leptin, and ghrelin and on appetite in normal-weight women. Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.), 23(2), pp. 103-12.
Melanson KJ, et al. Effects of High-fructose Corn Syrup and Sucrose Consumption On Circulating Glucose, Insulin, Leptin, and Ghrelin and On Appetite in Normal-weight Women. Nutrition. 2007;23(2):103-12. PubMed PMID: 17234503.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of high-fructose corn syrup and sucrose consumption on circulating glucose, insulin, leptin, and ghrelin and on appetite in normal-weight women. AU - Melanson,Kathleen J, AU - Zukley,Linda, AU - Lowndes,Joshua, AU - Nguyen,Von, AU - Angelopoulos,Theodore J, AU - Rippe,James M, PY - 2006/08/07/received PY - 2006/10/20/revised PY - 2006/11/06/accepted PY - 2007/1/20/pubmed PY - 2007/4/18/medline PY - 2007/1/20/entrez SP - 103 EP - 12 JF - Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.) JO - Nutrition VL - 23 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Fructose has been implicated in obesity, partly due to lack of insulin-mediated leptin stimulation and ghrelin suppression. Most work has examined effects of pure fructose, rather than high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS), the most commonly consumed form of fructose. This study examined effects of beverages sweetened with HFCS or sucrose (Suc), when consumed with mixed meals, on blood glucose, insulin, leptin, ghrelin, and appetite. METHODS: Thirty lean women were studied on two randomized 2-d visits during which HFCS- and Suc-sweetened beverages were consumed as 30% of energy on isocaloric diets during day 1 while blood was sampled. On day 2, food was eaten ad libitum. Subjects rated appetite at designated times throughout visits. RESULTS: No significant differences between the two sweeteners were seen in fasting plasma glucose, insulin, leptin, and ghrelin (P > 0.05). The within-day variation in all four items was not different between the two visits (P > 0.05). Net areas under the curve were similar for glucose, insulin, and leptin (P > 0.05). There were no differences in energy or macronutrient intake on day 2. The only appetite variable that differed between sweeteners was desire to eat, which had a higher area under the curve the day after Suc compared with HFCS. CONCLUSION: These short-term results suggest that, when fructose is consumed in the form of HFCS, the measured metabolic responses do not differ from Suc in lean women. Further research is required to examine appetite responses and to determine if these findings hold true for obese individuals, males, or longer periods. SN - 0899-9007 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17234503/Effects_of_high_fructose_corn_syrup_and_sucrose_consumption_on_circulating_glucose_insulin_leptin_and_ghrelin_and_on_appetite_in_normal_weight_women_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0899-9007(06)00392-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -