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Effect of eicosapentaenoic/docosahexaenoic fatty acids and soluble fibers on blood lipids of individuals classified into different levels of lipidemia.
Nutrition 2007; 23(2):127-37N

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

This study evaluated the effect of a formulation containing eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid combined with soluble fibers (beta-glucan and guar gum) on fasting blood lipids used as coronary heart disease biomarkers of individuals classified into different levels of lipidemia by multivariate techniques.

METHODS

Serum total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triacylglycerol, plasma glucose concentrations, body mass index, age, and waist circumference were determined in 99 healthy volunteers. Three clusters or subgroups were identified according to coronary heart disease risk levels. Within each cluster, individuals were randomly assigned to one of four experimental groups, with each group receiving samples of a functional formulation containing 460 mg of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and/or 580 mg of soluble fibers, and placebo to be consumed in one bottle per day (200 mL) for 6 wk.

RESULTS

No significant changes were observed for triacylglycerol (P = 0.281) and total cholesterol (P = 0.082) concentrations across the three subgroups. Soluble dietary fibers improved the sensory quality of the formulation containing eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid. The efficiency of cluster analysis to discriminate individuals in subgroups was confirmed by one-way analysis of variance (P < 0.003).

CONCLUSION

The omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation equivalent to fish consumed 2.5 to 3 times per week by a functional food-containing soluble dietary fiber showed no beneficial result in terms of changes in blood lipids in individuals classified according to different levels of lipidemia. Small numbers of patients in each cluster and possibly the low dose of fish oil and soluble dietary fibers used in this study may have also contributed to the lack of these differences. Multivariate techniques proved to be a very efficient tool to solve the heterogeneity problem usually observed in human designs and to evaluate the results within subgroups categorized by n variables extracted from the same population.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Food and Experimental Nutrition, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Science, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. inar@usp.brNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17234506

Citation

Castro, Inar A., et al. "Effect of Eicosapentaenoic/docosahexaenoic Fatty Acids and Soluble Fibers On Blood Lipids of Individuals Classified Into Different Levels of Lipidemia." Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.), vol. 23, no. 2, 2007, pp. 127-37.
Castro IA, Monteiro VC, Barroso LP, et al. Effect of eicosapentaenoic/docosahexaenoic fatty acids and soluble fibers on blood lipids of individuals classified into different levels of lipidemia. Nutrition. 2007;23(2):127-37.
Castro, I. A., Monteiro, V. C., Barroso, L. P., & Bertolami, M. C. (2007). Effect of eicosapentaenoic/docosahexaenoic fatty acids and soluble fibers on blood lipids of individuals classified into different levels of lipidemia. Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.), 23(2), pp. 127-37.
Castro IA, et al. Effect of Eicosapentaenoic/docosahexaenoic Fatty Acids and Soluble Fibers On Blood Lipids of Individuals Classified Into Different Levels of Lipidemia. Nutrition. 2007;23(2):127-37. PubMed PMID: 17234506.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of eicosapentaenoic/docosahexaenoic fatty acids and soluble fibers on blood lipids of individuals classified into different levels of lipidemia. AU - Castro,Inar A, AU - Monteiro,Vânia C B, AU - Barroso,Lúcia P, AU - Bertolami,Marcelo C, PY - 2006/06/26/received PY - 2006/10/16/revised PY - 2006/11/22/accepted PY - 2007/1/20/pubmed PY - 2007/4/18/medline PY - 2007/1/20/entrez SP - 127 EP - 37 JF - Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.) JO - Nutrition VL - 23 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the effect of a formulation containing eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid combined with soluble fibers (beta-glucan and guar gum) on fasting blood lipids used as coronary heart disease biomarkers of individuals classified into different levels of lipidemia by multivariate techniques. METHODS: Serum total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triacylglycerol, plasma glucose concentrations, body mass index, age, and waist circumference were determined in 99 healthy volunteers. Three clusters or subgroups were identified according to coronary heart disease risk levels. Within each cluster, individuals were randomly assigned to one of four experimental groups, with each group receiving samples of a functional formulation containing 460 mg of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and/or 580 mg of soluble fibers, and placebo to be consumed in one bottle per day (200 mL) for 6 wk. RESULTS: No significant changes were observed for triacylglycerol (P = 0.281) and total cholesterol (P = 0.082) concentrations across the three subgroups. Soluble dietary fibers improved the sensory quality of the formulation containing eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid. The efficiency of cluster analysis to discriminate individuals in subgroups was confirmed by one-way analysis of variance (P < 0.003). CONCLUSION: The omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation equivalent to fish consumed 2.5 to 3 times per week by a functional food-containing soluble dietary fiber showed no beneficial result in terms of changes in blood lipids in individuals classified according to different levels of lipidemia. Small numbers of patients in each cluster and possibly the low dose of fish oil and soluble dietary fibers used in this study may have also contributed to the lack of these differences. Multivariate techniques proved to be a very efficient tool to solve the heterogeneity problem usually observed in human designs and to evaluate the results within subgroups categorized by n variables extracted from the same population. SN - 0899-9007 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17234506/Effect_of_eicosapentaenoic/docosahexaenoic_fatty_acids_and_soluble_fibers_on_blood_lipids_of_individuals_classified_into_different_levels_of_lipidemia_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0899-9007(06)00397-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -