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Fatty acid intake and the risk of community-acquired pneumonia in U.S. women.
Nutrition 2007; 23(3):196-202N

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Despite substantial progress in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia, there are limited data on dietary risk factors. Fatty acid intake may influence community-acquired pneumonia risk by modulating the immune system. Our study prospectively examined the association between fatty acid intake and community-acquired pneumonia risk.

METHODS

The study population included 83165 women from the Nurses' Health Study II cohort who were 27 to 44 y old in 1991. The women reported lifestyle habits on biennial questionnaires and dietary intake every 4 y by validated semiquantitative food frequency questionnaires. There were 925 pneumonia cases over 10 y of follow-up. We examined independent associations for six fatty acids using Cox's proportional hazards regression.

RESULTS

Women in the highest quintile of palmitic acid intake had a 54% greater risk of pneumonia compared with those in the lowest quintile (multivariate relative risk 1.54, 95% confidence interval 1.12-2.12, P for trend = 0.002). Oleic acid intake was inversely associated with pneumonia risk (highest quintile multivariate relative risk 0.75, 95% confidence interval 0.55-1.04, P for trend = 0.02). Women in the highest quintile of docosahexanoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid intake had a 24% greater risk of community-acquired pneumonia than did those in the lowest quintile (multivariate relative risk 1.24, 95% confidence interval 1.00-1.55, P for trend = 0.08). No significant associations were found for linoleic acid, alpha-linolenic acid, or docosahexanoic acid alone.

CONCLUSION

Fatty acid intake may affect the risk of community-acquired pneumonia in young and middle-aged women. Higher dietary intake of palmitic acid and possibly docosahexanoic and eicosapentaenoic acids may increase the risk of community-acquired pneumonia in women, whereas higher oleic acid intake may decrease the risk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17236748

Citation

Alperovich, Michael, et al. "Fatty Acid Intake and the Risk of Community-acquired Pneumonia in U.S. Women." Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.), vol. 23, no. 3, 2007, pp. 196-202.
Alperovich M, Neuman MI, Willett WC, et al. Fatty acid intake and the risk of community-acquired pneumonia in U.S. women. Nutrition. 2007;23(3):196-202.
Alperovich, M., Neuman, M. I., Willett, W. C., & Curhan, G. C. (2007). Fatty acid intake and the risk of community-acquired pneumonia in U.S. women. Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.), 23(3), pp. 196-202.
Alperovich M, et al. Fatty Acid Intake and the Risk of Community-acquired Pneumonia in U.S. Women. Nutrition. 2007;23(3):196-202. PubMed PMID: 17236748.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fatty acid intake and the risk of community-acquired pneumonia in U.S. women. AU - Alperovich,Michael, AU - Neuman,Mark I, AU - Willett,Walter C, AU - Curhan,Gary C, Y1 - 2007/01/22/ PY - 2006/08/17/received PY - 2006/10/26/revised PY - 2006/11/30/accepted PY - 2007/1/24/pubmed PY - 2007/5/30/medline PY - 2007/1/24/entrez SP - 196 EP - 202 JF - Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.) JO - Nutrition VL - 23 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Despite substantial progress in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia, there are limited data on dietary risk factors. Fatty acid intake may influence community-acquired pneumonia risk by modulating the immune system. Our study prospectively examined the association between fatty acid intake and community-acquired pneumonia risk. METHODS: The study population included 83165 women from the Nurses' Health Study II cohort who were 27 to 44 y old in 1991. The women reported lifestyle habits on biennial questionnaires and dietary intake every 4 y by validated semiquantitative food frequency questionnaires. There were 925 pneumonia cases over 10 y of follow-up. We examined independent associations for six fatty acids using Cox's proportional hazards regression. RESULTS: Women in the highest quintile of palmitic acid intake had a 54% greater risk of pneumonia compared with those in the lowest quintile (multivariate relative risk 1.54, 95% confidence interval 1.12-2.12, P for trend = 0.002). Oleic acid intake was inversely associated with pneumonia risk (highest quintile multivariate relative risk 0.75, 95% confidence interval 0.55-1.04, P for trend = 0.02). Women in the highest quintile of docosahexanoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid intake had a 24% greater risk of community-acquired pneumonia than did those in the lowest quintile (multivariate relative risk 1.24, 95% confidence interval 1.00-1.55, P for trend = 0.08). No significant associations were found for linoleic acid, alpha-linolenic acid, or docosahexanoic acid alone. CONCLUSION: Fatty acid intake may affect the risk of community-acquired pneumonia in young and middle-aged women. Higher dietary intake of palmitic acid and possibly docosahexanoic and eicosapentaenoic acids may increase the risk of community-acquired pneumonia in women, whereas higher oleic acid intake may decrease the risk. SN - 0899-9007 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17236748/Fatty_acid_intake_and_the_risk_of_community_acquired_pneumonia_in_U_S__women_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0899-9007(06)00418-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -