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Special infectious disease risks of expatriates and long-term travelers in tropical countries. Part I: malaria.
J Travel Med. 2007 Jan-Feb; 14(1):42-9.JT

Abstract

Malaria risk is dependent upon the entomological inoculation rate actually faced by the long-term traveler. Risk is cumulative, increases with duration of exposure, is greatest in rural and periurban areas, and least in urban centers. Risk may be zero in some urban centers, especially during dry seasons. Chemoprophylaxis compliance is hindered by the high adverse event rate often reported by users, is often suboptimal in expatriates, and decreases with duration of stay. Compliance with personal protection measures may also be suboptimal, and use of insecticide-treated nets and effective repellents should be encouraged. Alternative strategies to mitigate risk include seasonal chemoprophylaxis, nonuse of chemoprophylaxis with rapid treatment, self-testing, self-treatment where competent care and quality drugs are unavailable, and vector control. Choice of strategies will depend upon assessment of actual risk and likely compliance, with a combination of measures usually appropriate.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Royal Free and University College Medical School, London, UK. malaria@freesurf.chNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17241253

Citation

Toovey, Stephen, et al. "Special Infectious Disease Risks of Expatriates and Long-term Travelers in Tropical Countries. Part I: Malaria." Journal of Travel Medicine, vol. 14, no. 1, 2007, pp. 42-9.
Toovey S, Moerman F, van Gompel A. Special infectious disease risks of expatriates and long-term travelers in tropical countries. Part I: malaria. J Travel Med. 2007;14(1):42-9.
Toovey, S., Moerman, F., & van Gompel, A. (2007). Special infectious disease risks of expatriates and long-term travelers in tropical countries. Part I: malaria. Journal of Travel Medicine, 14(1), 42-9.
Toovey S, Moerman F, van Gompel A. Special Infectious Disease Risks of Expatriates and Long-term Travelers in Tropical Countries. Part I: Malaria. J Travel Med. 2007;14(1):42-9. PubMed PMID: 17241253.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Special infectious disease risks of expatriates and long-term travelers in tropical countries. Part I: malaria. AU - Toovey,Stephen, AU - Moerman,Filip, AU - van Gompel,Alfons, PY - 2007/1/24/pubmed PY - 2007/3/22/medline PY - 2007/1/24/entrez SP - 42 EP - 9 JF - Journal of travel medicine JO - J Travel Med VL - 14 IS - 1 N2 - Malaria risk is dependent upon the entomological inoculation rate actually faced by the long-term traveler. Risk is cumulative, increases with duration of exposure, is greatest in rural and periurban areas, and least in urban centers. Risk may be zero in some urban centers, especially during dry seasons. Chemoprophylaxis compliance is hindered by the high adverse event rate often reported by users, is often suboptimal in expatriates, and decreases with duration of stay. Compliance with personal protection measures may also be suboptimal, and use of insecticide-treated nets and effective repellents should be encouraged. Alternative strategies to mitigate risk include seasonal chemoprophylaxis, nonuse of chemoprophylaxis with rapid treatment, self-testing, self-treatment where competent care and quality drugs are unavailable, and vector control. Choice of strategies will depend upon assessment of actual risk and likely compliance, with a combination of measures usually appropriate. SN - 1195-1982 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17241253/Special_infectious_disease_risks_of_expatriates_and_long_term_travelers_in_tropical_countries__Part_I:_malaria_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jtm/article-lookup/doi/10.1111/j.1708-8305.2006.00091.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -