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Special infectious disease risks of expatriates and long-term travelers in tropical countries. Part II: infections other than malaria.
J Travel Med 2007 Jan-Feb; 14(1):50-60JT

Abstract

A wide range of viral, bacterial, and protozoal diseases pose risk to long-term tropical travelers. Risk varies geographically and with lifestyle. For some infections, risk increases with duration of stay, coming to resemble that of the local population. Risk management strategies include vaccination, chemoprophylaxis, avoidance measures, and screening, where appropriate. Vaccination against hepatitis A and B, typhoid, and rabies is recommended for all long-term travelers to (sub-)tropical areas. Lowering of the vaccination threshold for Japanese encephalitis is suggested. Meningococcal disease is rare in travelers, but vaccination is safe and acceptable. The efficacy of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is uncertain; immunological testing avoids BCG's confounding of tuberculin testing. Diarrhea is common, and self-treatment may be recommended. Sexually transmitted infections including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are serious risks; education, screening, and HIV postexposure prophylaxis following involuntary exposure are recommended. Many infections are chronic or asymptomatic, and appropriate screening is recommended on return or after prolonged exposure.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Royal Free Hospital Medical School, London, UK. malaria@freesurf.chNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17241254

Citation

Toovey, Stephen, et al. "Special Infectious Disease Risks of Expatriates and Long-term Travelers in Tropical Countries. Part II: Infections Other Than Malaria." Journal of Travel Medicine, vol. 14, no. 1, 2007, pp. 50-60.
Toovey S, Moerman F, van Gompel A. Special infectious disease risks of expatriates and long-term travelers in tropical countries. Part II: infections other than malaria. J Travel Med. 2007;14(1):50-60.
Toovey, S., Moerman, F., & van Gompel, A. (2007). Special infectious disease risks of expatriates and long-term travelers in tropical countries. Part II: infections other than malaria. Journal of Travel Medicine, 14(1), pp. 50-60.
Toovey S, Moerman F, van Gompel A. Special Infectious Disease Risks of Expatriates and Long-term Travelers in Tropical Countries. Part II: Infections Other Than Malaria. J Travel Med. 2007;14(1):50-60. PubMed PMID: 17241254.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Special infectious disease risks of expatriates and long-term travelers in tropical countries. Part II: infections other than malaria. AU - Toovey,Stephen, AU - Moerman,Filip, AU - van Gompel,Alfons, PY - 2007/1/24/pubmed PY - 2007/3/22/medline PY - 2007/1/24/entrez SP - 50 EP - 60 JF - Journal of travel medicine JO - J Travel Med VL - 14 IS - 1 N2 - A wide range of viral, bacterial, and protozoal diseases pose risk to long-term tropical travelers. Risk varies geographically and with lifestyle. For some infections, risk increases with duration of stay, coming to resemble that of the local population. Risk management strategies include vaccination, chemoprophylaxis, avoidance measures, and screening, where appropriate. Vaccination against hepatitis A and B, typhoid, and rabies is recommended for all long-term travelers to (sub-)tropical areas. Lowering of the vaccination threshold for Japanese encephalitis is suggested. Meningococcal disease is rare in travelers, but vaccination is safe and acceptable. The efficacy of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is uncertain; immunological testing avoids BCG's confounding of tuberculin testing. Diarrhea is common, and self-treatment may be recommended. Sexually transmitted infections including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are serious risks; education, screening, and HIV postexposure prophylaxis following involuntary exposure are recommended. Many infections are chronic or asymptomatic, and appropriate screening is recommended on return or after prolonged exposure. SN - 1195-1982 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17241254/Special_infectious_disease_risks_of_expatriates_and_long_term_travelers_in_tropical_countries__Part_II:_infections_other_than_malaria_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jtm/article-lookup/doi/10.1111/j.1708-8305.2006.00092.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -