Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Clinical impact of GB virus C viremia on patients with HIV type 1 infection in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy.
Clin Infect Dis. 2007 Feb 15; 44(4):584-90.CI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The influence of GB virus C (GBV-C) viremia on clinical outcomes of patients with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection remains controversial in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART).

METHODS

A prospective observational study was conducted to describe the epidemiology of GBV-C viremia and assess its clinical impact on treatment responses to HAART in 385 HIV-1-infected patients during the period from January 1999 through June 2004.

RESULTS

A total of 59 patients (15.3%) had detectable GBV-C RNA viremia during a median observation of 3.6 years (range, 1.0-7.0 years); 47 patients (12.2%) had GBV-C viremia at enrollment, and 12 (3.1%) acquired GBV-C infection during follow-up. Thirty-two (68.1%) of the 47 patients with baseline GBV-C viremia had persistent GBV-C viremia. Compared with patients with clearance of GBV-C viremia (n=15) and patients without detectable GBV-C viremia (n=326), patients with persistent GBV-C viremia were more likely to be men who have sex with men (81.3% vs. 60.4%; P=.02), tended to have lower baseline plasma HIV RNA load (HIV RNA load > or =5 log(10) copies/mL, 31.3% vs. 49.4%; P=.05), and had a higher proportion of isolated anti-hepatitis B core antibody (37.5% vs. 17.2%; P=.005). There was no statistically significant difference in terms of virologic, immunologic, and clinical responses to HAART; occurrence of hepatic events; and mortality among the 3 groups.

CONCLUSIONS

Persistent GBV-C viremia is significantly associated with male-male sex in HIV-infected patients with advanced immunodeficiency, and persistent GBV-C viremia does not confer short-term benefit in patients receiving HAART.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17243064

Citation

Sheng, Wang-Huei, et al. "Clinical Impact of GB Virus C Viremia On Patients With HIV Type 1 Infection in the Era of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy." Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, vol. 44, no. 4, 2007, pp. 584-90.
Sheng WH, Hung CC, Wu RJ, et al. Clinical impact of GB virus C viremia on patients with HIV type 1 infection in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy. Clin Infect Dis. 2007;44(4):584-90.
Sheng, W. H., Hung, C. C., Wu, R. J., Wang, J. T., Chen, P. J., Chang, S. C., & Kao, J. H. (2007). Clinical impact of GB virus C viremia on patients with HIV type 1 infection in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy. Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, 44(4), 584-90.
Sheng WH, et al. Clinical Impact of GB Virus C Viremia On Patients With HIV Type 1 Infection in the Era of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy. Clin Infect Dis. 2007 Feb 15;44(4):584-90. PubMed PMID: 17243064.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Clinical impact of GB virus C viremia on patients with HIV type 1 infection in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy. AU - Sheng,Wang-Huei, AU - Hung,Chien-Ching, AU - Wu,Ruei-Jiuan, AU - Wang,Jann-Tay, AU - Chen,Pei-Jer, AU - Chang,Shan-Chwen, AU - Kao,Jia-Horng, Y1 - 2007/01/17/ PY - 2006/07/19/received PY - 2006/10/12/accepted PY - 2007/1/24/pubmed PY - 2007/3/1/medline PY - 2007/1/24/entrez SP - 584 EP - 90 JF - Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America JO - Clin Infect Dis VL - 44 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: The influence of GB virus C (GBV-C) viremia on clinical outcomes of patients with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection remains controversial in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). METHODS: A prospective observational study was conducted to describe the epidemiology of GBV-C viremia and assess its clinical impact on treatment responses to HAART in 385 HIV-1-infected patients during the period from January 1999 through June 2004. RESULTS: A total of 59 patients (15.3%) had detectable GBV-C RNA viremia during a median observation of 3.6 years (range, 1.0-7.0 years); 47 patients (12.2%) had GBV-C viremia at enrollment, and 12 (3.1%) acquired GBV-C infection during follow-up. Thirty-two (68.1%) of the 47 patients with baseline GBV-C viremia had persistent GBV-C viremia. Compared with patients with clearance of GBV-C viremia (n=15) and patients without detectable GBV-C viremia (n=326), patients with persistent GBV-C viremia were more likely to be men who have sex with men (81.3% vs. 60.4%; P=.02), tended to have lower baseline plasma HIV RNA load (HIV RNA load > or =5 log(10) copies/mL, 31.3% vs. 49.4%; P=.05), and had a higher proportion of isolated anti-hepatitis B core antibody (37.5% vs. 17.2%; P=.005). There was no statistically significant difference in terms of virologic, immunologic, and clinical responses to HAART; occurrence of hepatic events; and mortality among the 3 groups. CONCLUSIONS: Persistent GBV-C viremia is significantly associated with male-male sex in HIV-infected patients with advanced immunodeficiency, and persistent GBV-C viremia does not confer short-term benefit in patients receiving HAART. SN - 1537-6591 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17243064/Clinical_impact_of_GB_virus_C_viremia_on_patients_with_HIV_type_1_infection_in_the_era_of_highly_active_antiretroviral_therapy_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/cid/article-lookup/doi/10.1086/511037 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -