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Regular alcohol drinking is a determinant of masked morning hypertension detected by home blood pressure monitoring in medicated hypertensive patients with well-controlled clinic blood pressure: the Jichi Morning Hypertension Research (J-MORE) study.
Hypertens Res 2006; 29(9):679-86HR

Abstract

Morning blood pressure (BP) level may play an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular events; however, morning BP detected by home BP monitoring may remain uncontrolled in medicated hypertensive patients even when clinic BP is well controlled (masked morning hypertension: MMHT). We studied the determinants of MMHT in stably medicated hypertensive outpatients. In the Jichi Morning Hypertension Research (J-MORE) study, 969 consecutive hypertensive outpatients were recruited by 43 doctors in 32 different institutes. They had been under stable antihypertensive medication status at least for 3 months. Clinic BP was measured on 2 different days and self-measured BP monitoring was conducted twice consecutively in the morning and evening for 3 days. Four-hundred and five patients had well-controlled clinic BP (systolic BP [SBP]<140 mmHg and diastolic BP [DBP]<90 mmHg). Among them, 246 patients (60.7%) had MMHT (morning SBP > or =135 mmHg and/or DBP > or =85 mmHg). Compared with the patients with normal clinic BP and morning BP, the patients with MMHT had a significantly higher prevalence of regular alcohol drinkers (35.0% vs. 23.3%, p=0.012), a significantly higher number of antihypertensive drug classes (1.83 +/- 0.82 vs. 1.66 +/- 0.84, p = 0.04) and a significantly higher clinic BP level (SBP: 130.4 +/- 7.6 mmHg vs. 127.8 +/- 8.4 mmHg, p = 0.001; DBP: 75.5 +/- 7.6 mmHg vs. 73.6 +/- 7.6 mmHg, p = 0.013). In logistic regression analysis, independent determinants for MMHT were regular alcohol drinking (odds ratio [OR]: 1.76; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.99-3.12; p = 0.05) and higher-normal clinic BP (130/85 mmHg < clinic SBP/DBP < 140/90 mmHg) (OR: 1.60; 95% CI: 1.05-2.44; p = 0.03) after adjustment for confounding factors. The patients who both drank alcohol regularly and had a higher-normal clinic BP had 2.71 times higher risk for MMHT than those who did not drink alcohol regularly and had a relatively lower-normal clinic BP (<130/85 mmHg) (p < 0.01). In conclusion, regular alcohol drinking is an independent determinant for MMHT detected by home BP monitoring in medicated hypertensive patients with well-controlled clinic BP.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Jichi Medial University School of Medicine, Shimotsuke, Japan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17249523

Citation

Ishikawa, Joji, et al. "Regular Alcohol Drinking Is a Determinant of Masked Morning Hypertension Detected By Home Blood Pressure Monitoring in Medicated Hypertensive Patients With Well-controlled Clinic Blood Pressure: the Jichi Morning Hypertension Research (J-MORE) Study." Hypertension Research : Official Journal of the Japanese Society of Hypertension, vol. 29, no. 9, 2006, pp. 679-86.
Ishikawa J, Kario K, Eguchi K, et al. Regular alcohol drinking is a determinant of masked morning hypertension detected by home blood pressure monitoring in medicated hypertensive patients with well-controlled clinic blood pressure: the Jichi Morning Hypertension Research (J-MORE) study. Hypertens Res. 2006;29(9):679-86.
Ishikawa, J., Kario, K., Eguchi, K., Morinari, M., Hoshide, S., Ishikawa, S., & Shimada, K. (2006). Regular alcohol drinking is a determinant of masked morning hypertension detected by home blood pressure monitoring in medicated hypertensive patients with well-controlled clinic blood pressure: the Jichi Morning Hypertension Research (J-MORE) study. Hypertension Research : Official Journal of the Japanese Society of Hypertension, 29(9), pp. 679-86.
Ishikawa J, et al. Regular Alcohol Drinking Is a Determinant of Masked Morning Hypertension Detected By Home Blood Pressure Monitoring in Medicated Hypertensive Patients With Well-controlled Clinic Blood Pressure: the Jichi Morning Hypertension Research (J-MORE) Study. Hypertens Res. 2006;29(9):679-86. PubMed PMID: 17249523.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Regular alcohol drinking is a determinant of masked morning hypertension detected by home blood pressure monitoring in medicated hypertensive patients with well-controlled clinic blood pressure: the Jichi Morning Hypertension Research (J-MORE) study. AU - Ishikawa,Joji, AU - Kario,Kazuomi, AU - Eguchi,Kazuo, AU - Morinari,Masato, AU - Hoshide,Satoshi, AU - Ishikawa,Shizukiyo, AU - Shimada,Kazuyuki, AU - ,, PY - 2007/1/26/pubmed PY - 2007/2/28/medline PY - 2007/1/26/entrez SP - 679 EP - 86 JF - Hypertension research : official journal of the Japanese Society of Hypertension JO - Hypertens. Res. VL - 29 IS - 9 N2 - Morning blood pressure (BP) level may play an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular events; however, morning BP detected by home BP monitoring may remain uncontrolled in medicated hypertensive patients even when clinic BP is well controlled (masked morning hypertension: MMHT). We studied the determinants of MMHT in stably medicated hypertensive outpatients. In the Jichi Morning Hypertension Research (J-MORE) study, 969 consecutive hypertensive outpatients were recruited by 43 doctors in 32 different institutes. They had been under stable antihypertensive medication status at least for 3 months. Clinic BP was measured on 2 different days and self-measured BP monitoring was conducted twice consecutively in the morning and evening for 3 days. Four-hundred and five patients had well-controlled clinic BP (systolic BP [SBP]<140 mmHg and diastolic BP [DBP]<90 mmHg). Among them, 246 patients (60.7%) had MMHT (morning SBP > or =135 mmHg and/or DBP > or =85 mmHg). Compared with the patients with normal clinic BP and morning BP, the patients with MMHT had a significantly higher prevalence of regular alcohol drinkers (35.0% vs. 23.3%, p=0.012), a significantly higher number of antihypertensive drug classes (1.83 +/- 0.82 vs. 1.66 +/- 0.84, p = 0.04) and a significantly higher clinic BP level (SBP: 130.4 +/- 7.6 mmHg vs. 127.8 +/- 8.4 mmHg, p = 0.001; DBP: 75.5 +/- 7.6 mmHg vs. 73.6 +/- 7.6 mmHg, p = 0.013). In logistic regression analysis, independent determinants for MMHT were regular alcohol drinking (odds ratio [OR]: 1.76; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.99-3.12; p = 0.05) and higher-normal clinic BP (130/85 mmHg < clinic SBP/DBP < 140/90 mmHg) (OR: 1.60; 95% CI: 1.05-2.44; p = 0.03) after adjustment for confounding factors. The patients who both drank alcohol regularly and had a higher-normal clinic BP had 2.71 times higher risk for MMHT than those who did not drink alcohol regularly and had a relatively lower-normal clinic BP (<130/85 mmHg) (p < 0.01). In conclusion, regular alcohol drinking is an independent determinant for MMHT detected by home BP monitoring in medicated hypertensive patients with well-controlled clinic BP. SN - 0916-9636 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17249523/Regular_alcohol_drinking_is_a_determinant_of_masked_morning_hypertension_detected_by_home_blood_pressure_monitoring_in_medicated_hypertensive_patients_with_well_controlled_clinic_blood_pressure:_the_Jichi_Morning_Hypertension_Research__J_MORE__study_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1291/hypres.29.679 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -