Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

A double-blind evaluation of gabapentin on alcohol effects and drinking in a clinical laboratory paradigm.
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2007 Feb; 31(2):221-7.AC

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

There has been increasing interest in the use of anticonvulsant agents in the treatment of alcoholism. Anticonvulsant agents have mostly been evaluated as an alternative to benzodiazepines in the treatment of alcohol withdrawal. Among the advantages of using anticonvulsant agents in this capacity is their purported lack of interaction with alcohol (i.e., interactions that could increase psychomotor deficits, cognitive impairment, and increase intoxication). This is particularly important in the treatment of alcohol withdrawal and relapse prevention in outpatients. Unfortunately, these untoward clinical interactions between anticonvulsants and alcohol in alcoholic patients have not been thoroughly assessed. The current clinical laboratory study was conducted to evaluate the safety and tolerability of the anticonvulsant gabapentin in alcoholic subjects. In addition, the ability of gabapentin to reduce alcohol craving and consumption was evaluated.

METHODS

Thirty-five non-treatment-seeking alcoholic subjects were enrolled in a subacute human laboratory study and received double-blind treatment with up to 1,200 mg of gabapentin (n=18) or placebo (n=17) for 8 days. The safety and tolerability of gabapentin were monitored in the natural environment during the first 5 days of medication treatment and during a free-choice limited access consumption paradigm following an initial drink of alcohol in a bar-lab setting on Day 7.

RESULTS

There was no overall effect of gabapentin on drinking or craving; however, it was tolerated (e.g., mood and sedation) as well as placebo over 5 days of natural drinking. During the bar-lab drinking session, there were no differences in subjective high or intoxication between subjects treated with gabapentin or placebo.

DISCUSSION

This study provides initial evidence that the anticonvulsant gabapentin is safe if used in conjunction with alcohol consumption in alcoholic individuals. Further study is needed with this and other lab models to determine the utility and safety of gabapentin in the treatment of alcoholism.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Ralph H. Johnson Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Research and Development Service, Charleston, South Carolina, USA. myrickh@musc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17250613

Citation

Myrick, Hugh, et al. "A Double-blind Evaluation of Gabapentin On Alcohol Effects and Drinking in a Clinical Laboratory Paradigm." Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research, vol. 31, no. 2, 2007, pp. 221-7.
Myrick H, Anton R, Voronin K, et al. A double-blind evaluation of gabapentin on alcohol effects and drinking in a clinical laboratory paradigm. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2007;31(2):221-7.
Myrick, H., Anton, R., Voronin, K., Wang, W., & Henderson, S. (2007). A double-blind evaluation of gabapentin on alcohol effects and drinking in a clinical laboratory paradigm. Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research, 31(2), 221-7.
Myrick H, et al. A Double-blind Evaluation of Gabapentin On Alcohol Effects and Drinking in a Clinical Laboratory Paradigm. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2007;31(2):221-7. PubMed PMID: 17250613.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A double-blind evaluation of gabapentin on alcohol effects and drinking in a clinical laboratory paradigm. AU - Myrick,Hugh, AU - Anton,Raymond, AU - Voronin,Konstantin, AU - Wang,Wei, AU - Henderson,Scott, PY - 2007/1/26/pubmed PY - 2007/3/9/medline PY - 2007/1/26/entrez SP - 221 EP - 7 JF - Alcoholism, clinical and experimental research JO - Alcohol Clin Exp Res VL - 31 IS - 2 N2 - INTRODUCTION: There has been increasing interest in the use of anticonvulsant agents in the treatment of alcoholism. Anticonvulsant agents have mostly been evaluated as an alternative to benzodiazepines in the treatment of alcohol withdrawal. Among the advantages of using anticonvulsant agents in this capacity is their purported lack of interaction with alcohol (i.e., interactions that could increase psychomotor deficits, cognitive impairment, and increase intoxication). This is particularly important in the treatment of alcohol withdrawal and relapse prevention in outpatients. Unfortunately, these untoward clinical interactions between anticonvulsants and alcohol in alcoholic patients have not been thoroughly assessed. The current clinical laboratory study was conducted to evaluate the safety and tolerability of the anticonvulsant gabapentin in alcoholic subjects. In addition, the ability of gabapentin to reduce alcohol craving and consumption was evaluated. METHODS: Thirty-five non-treatment-seeking alcoholic subjects were enrolled in a subacute human laboratory study and received double-blind treatment with up to 1,200 mg of gabapentin (n=18) or placebo (n=17) for 8 days. The safety and tolerability of gabapentin were monitored in the natural environment during the first 5 days of medication treatment and during a free-choice limited access consumption paradigm following an initial drink of alcohol in a bar-lab setting on Day 7. RESULTS: There was no overall effect of gabapentin on drinking or craving; however, it was tolerated (e.g., mood and sedation) as well as placebo over 5 days of natural drinking. During the bar-lab drinking session, there were no differences in subjective high or intoxication between subjects treated with gabapentin or placebo. DISCUSSION: This study provides initial evidence that the anticonvulsant gabapentin is safe if used in conjunction with alcohol consumption in alcoholic individuals. Further study is needed with this and other lab models to determine the utility and safety of gabapentin in the treatment of alcoholism. SN - 0145-6008 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17250613/A_double_blind_evaluation_of_gabapentin_on_alcohol_effects_and_drinking_in_a_clinical_laboratory_paradigm_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1530-0277.2006.00299.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -