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Risk for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in Hispanic youth with BMI > or =95th percentile.
J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2007 Feb; 44(2):228-36.JP

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To characterize children at risk for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and to explore possible mechanisms underlying the development of NAFLD in Hispanic youth with a body mass index > or =95th percentile.

PATIENTS AND METHODS

Hispanic nonoverweight (n = 475) and overweight (n = 517) children, ages 4 to 19 y, were characterized in terms of body composition (dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry), maturation (Tanner stage), diet (24-h recall), physical activity (accelerometry), fitness (maximal oxygen uptake), and biochemical profile (fasting alanine aminotransferase [ALT], glucose, insulin, and lipids; inflammation markers such as adiponectin, leptin, C-reactive protein, and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1; and total antioxidants) using standard laboratory techniques. Risk for NAFLD was defined by fasting serum ALT values >97.5th percentile for age- and sex-specific reference values.

RESULTS

Fasting serum ALT was elevated in 24% of overweight children and in only 4% of nonoverweight children. Therefore, to identify risk factors associated with elevated ALT, the remaining statistical analysis was restricted to the overweight group. The percentage of overweight children with elevated ALT did not differ by sex, age, or Tanner stage. Weight, body mass index, z score, waist-to-hip ratio, fat-free mass, fat mass, and percent truncal fat mass were higher in the overweight children with elevated ALT. Fasting insulin, glucose, and homeostasis model-insulin resistance were higher in the overweight children with elevated ALT, as were triglycerides, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, thyroid-stimulating hormone, and triiodothyronine. Fasting serum leptin, C-reactive protein, and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 were significantly higher and adiponectin was lower in the overweight children with elevated ALT.

CONCLUSIONS

The risk for developing NAFLD was high in the overweight Hispanic children. The proportion of "at risk" children was not influenced by gender, age, or maturation. The risk for elevated ALT was predicted by the severity of obesity, central adiposity, hyperinsulinemia, hypertriglyceridemia, elevated thyroid-stimulating hormone, and systemic inflammation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Texas Medical School, Department of Pediatrics, Houston, TX, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17255837

Citation

Quirós-Tejeira, Rubén E., et al. "Risk for Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Hispanic Youth With BMI > or =95th Percentile." Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, vol. 44, no. 2, 2007, pp. 228-36.
Quirós-Tejeira RE, Rivera CA, Ziba TT, et al. Risk for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in Hispanic youth with BMI > or =95th percentile. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2007;44(2):228-36.
Quirós-Tejeira, R. E., Rivera, C. A., Ziba, T. T., Mehta, N., Smith, C. W., & Butte, N. F. (2007). Risk for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in Hispanic youth with BMI > or =95th percentile. Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, 44(2), 228-36.
Quirós-Tejeira RE, et al. Risk for Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Hispanic Youth With BMI > or =95th Percentile. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2007;44(2):228-36. PubMed PMID: 17255837.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Risk for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in Hispanic youth with BMI > or =95th percentile. AU - Quirós-Tejeira,Rubén E, AU - Rivera,Chantal A, AU - Ziba,Taonga T, AU - Mehta,Nitesh, AU - Smith,C Wayne, AU - Butte,Nancy F, PY - 2007/1/27/pubmed PY - 2007/2/6/medline PY - 2007/1/27/entrez SP - 228 EP - 36 JF - Journal of pediatric gastroenterology and nutrition JO - J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr VL - 44 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To characterize children at risk for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and to explore possible mechanisms underlying the development of NAFLD in Hispanic youth with a body mass index > or =95th percentile. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Hispanic nonoverweight (n = 475) and overweight (n = 517) children, ages 4 to 19 y, were characterized in terms of body composition (dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry), maturation (Tanner stage), diet (24-h recall), physical activity (accelerometry), fitness (maximal oxygen uptake), and biochemical profile (fasting alanine aminotransferase [ALT], glucose, insulin, and lipids; inflammation markers such as adiponectin, leptin, C-reactive protein, and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1; and total antioxidants) using standard laboratory techniques. Risk for NAFLD was defined by fasting serum ALT values >97.5th percentile for age- and sex-specific reference values. RESULTS: Fasting serum ALT was elevated in 24% of overweight children and in only 4% of nonoverweight children. Therefore, to identify risk factors associated with elevated ALT, the remaining statistical analysis was restricted to the overweight group. The percentage of overweight children with elevated ALT did not differ by sex, age, or Tanner stage. Weight, body mass index, z score, waist-to-hip ratio, fat-free mass, fat mass, and percent truncal fat mass were higher in the overweight children with elevated ALT. Fasting insulin, glucose, and homeostasis model-insulin resistance were higher in the overweight children with elevated ALT, as were triglycerides, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, thyroid-stimulating hormone, and triiodothyronine. Fasting serum leptin, C-reactive protein, and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 were significantly higher and adiponectin was lower in the overweight children with elevated ALT. CONCLUSIONS: The risk for developing NAFLD was high in the overweight Hispanic children. The proportion of "at risk" children was not influenced by gender, age, or maturation. The risk for elevated ALT was predicted by the severity of obesity, central adiposity, hyperinsulinemia, hypertriglyceridemia, elevated thyroid-stimulating hormone, and systemic inflammation. SN - 1536-4801 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17255837/Risk_for_nonalcoholic_fatty_liver_disease_in_Hispanic_youth_with_BMI_>_or_=95th_percentile_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/MPG.0b013e31802d4acc DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -