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Effect of cooking on garlic (Allium sativum L.) antiplatelet activity and thiosulfinates content.
J Agric Food Chem. 2007 Feb 21; 55(4):1280-8.JA

Abstract

The raw form of garlic and some of its preparations are widely recognized as antiplatelet agents that may contribute to the prevention of cardiovascular disease. Herein, we examined the in-vitro antiaggregatory activity (IVAA) of human blood platelets induced by extracts of garlic samples that were previously heated (in the form of crushed versus uncrushed cloves) using different cooking methods and intensities. The concentrations of allicin and pyruvate, two predictors of antiplatelet strength, were also monitored. Oven-heating at 200 degrees C or immersing in boiling water for 3 min or less did not affect the ability of garlic to inhibit platelet aggregation (as compared to raw garlic), whereas heating for 6 min completely suppressed IVAA in uncrushed, but not in previously crushed, samples. The latter samples had reduced, yet significant, antiplatelet activity. Prolonged incubation (more than 10 min) at these temperatures completely suppressed IVAA. Microwaved garlic had no effect on platelet aggregation. However, increasing the concentration of garlic juice in the aggregation reaction had a positive IVAA dose response in crushed, but not in uncrushed, microwaved samples. The addition of raw garlic juice to microwaved uncrushed garlic restored a full complement of antiplatelet activity that was completely lost without the garlic addition. Garlic-induced IVAA was always associated with allicin and pyruvate levels. Our results suggest that (1) allicin and thiosulfinates are responsible for the IVAA response, (2) crushing garlic before moderate cooking can reduce the loss of activity, and (3) the partial loss of antithrombotic effect in crushed-cooked garlic may be compensated by increasing the amount consumed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

INTA - EEA La Consulta and CONICET, INTA, EEA La Consulta CC8, San Carlos, Mendoza (5567), Argentina.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17256959

Citation

Cavagnaro, Pablo F., et al. "Effect of Cooking On Garlic (Allium Sativum L.) Antiplatelet Activity and Thiosulfinates Content." Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, vol. 55, no. 4, 2007, pp. 1280-8.
Cavagnaro PF, Camargo A, Galmarini CR, et al. Effect of cooking on garlic (Allium sativum L.) antiplatelet activity and thiosulfinates content. J Agric Food Chem. 2007;55(4):1280-8.
Cavagnaro, P. F., Camargo, A., Galmarini, C. R., & Simon, P. W. (2007). Effect of cooking on garlic (Allium sativum L.) antiplatelet activity and thiosulfinates content. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 55(4), 1280-8.
Cavagnaro PF, et al. Effect of Cooking On Garlic (Allium Sativum L.) Antiplatelet Activity and Thiosulfinates Content. J Agric Food Chem. 2007 Feb 21;55(4):1280-8. PubMed PMID: 17256959.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of cooking on garlic (Allium sativum L.) antiplatelet activity and thiosulfinates content. AU - Cavagnaro,Pablo F, AU - Camargo,Alejandra, AU - Galmarini,Claudio R, AU - Simon,Philipp W, Y1 - 2007/01/27/ PY - 2007/1/30/pubmed PY - 2007/6/7/medline PY - 2007/1/30/entrez SP - 1280 EP - 8 JF - Journal of agricultural and food chemistry JO - J Agric Food Chem VL - 55 IS - 4 N2 - The raw form of garlic and some of its preparations are widely recognized as antiplatelet agents that may contribute to the prevention of cardiovascular disease. Herein, we examined the in-vitro antiaggregatory activity (IVAA) of human blood platelets induced by extracts of garlic samples that were previously heated (in the form of crushed versus uncrushed cloves) using different cooking methods and intensities. The concentrations of allicin and pyruvate, two predictors of antiplatelet strength, were also monitored. Oven-heating at 200 degrees C or immersing in boiling water for 3 min or less did not affect the ability of garlic to inhibit platelet aggregation (as compared to raw garlic), whereas heating for 6 min completely suppressed IVAA in uncrushed, but not in previously crushed, samples. The latter samples had reduced, yet significant, antiplatelet activity. Prolonged incubation (more than 10 min) at these temperatures completely suppressed IVAA. Microwaved garlic had no effect on platelet aggregation. However, increasing the concentration of garlic juice in the aggregation reaction had a positive IVAA dose response in crushed, but not in uncrushed, microwaved samples. The addition of raw garlic juice to microwaved uncrushed garlic restored a full complement of antiplatelet activity that was completely lost without the garlic addition. Garlic-induced IVAA was always associated with allicin and pyruvate levels. Our results suggest that (1) allicin and thiosulfinates are responsible for the IVAA response, (2) crushing garlic before moderate cooking can reduce the loss of activity, and (3) the partial loss of antithrombotic effect in crushed-cooked garlic may be compensated by increasing the amount consumed. SN - 0021-8561 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17256959/Effect_of_cooking_on_garlic__Allium_sativum_L___antiplatelet_activity_and_thiosulfinates_content_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1021/jf062587s DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -