Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

The neural basis of the egocentric and allocentric spatial frame of reference.
Brain Res. 2007 Mar 16; 1137(1):92-103.BR

Abstract

The present study examines the functional and anatomical underpinnings of egocentric and allocentric coding of spatial coordinates. For this purpose, we set up a functional magnet resonance imaging experiment using verbal descriptions of spatial relations either with respect to the listener (egocentric) or without any body-centered relations (allocentric) to induce the two different spatial coding strategies. We aimed to identify and distinguish the neuroanatomical correlates of egocentric and allocentric spatial coding without any possible influences by visual stimulation. Results from sixteen participants show a general involvement of a bilateral fronto-parietal network associated with spatial information processing. Furthermore, the egocentric and allocentric conditions gave rise to activations in primary visual areas in both hemispheres. Moreover, data show separate neural circuits mediating different spatial coding strategies. While egocentric spatial coding mainly recruits the precuneus, allocentric coding of space activates a network comprising the right superior and inferior parietal lobe and the ventrolateral occipito-temporal cortex bilaterally. Furthermore, bilateral hippocampal involvement was observed during allocentric, but not during egocentric spatial processing. Our results demonstrate that the processing of egocentric spatial relations is mediated by medial superior-posterior areas, whereas allocentric spatial coding requires an additional involvement of right parietal cortex, the ventral visual stream and the hippocampal formation. These data suggest that a hierarchically organized processing system exists in which the egocentric spatial coding requires only a subsystem of the processing resources of the allocentric condition.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Division Neuropsychology, University of Zurich, Binzmühlestrasse 14, CH-8050 Zürich, Switzerland. tino.zaehle@psychologie.unizh.chNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17258693

Citation

Zaehle, Tino, et al. "The Neural Basis of the Egocentric and Allocentric Spatial Frame of Reference." Brain Research, vol. 1137, no. 1, 2007, pp. 92-103.
Zaehle T, Jordan K, Wüstenberg T, et al. The neural basis of the egocentric and allocentric spatial frame of reference. Brain Res. 2007;1137(1):92-103.
Zaehle, T., Jordan, K., Wüstenberg, T., Baudewig, J., Dechent, P., & Mast, F. W. (2007). The neural basis of the egocentric and allocentric spatial frame of reference. Brain Research, 1137(1), 92-103.
Zaehle T, et al. The Neural Basis of the Egocentric and Allocentric Spatial Frame of Reference. Brain Res. 2007 Mar 16;1137(1):92-103. PubMed PMID: 17258693.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The neural basis of the egocentric and allocentric spatial frame of reference. AU - Zaehle,Tino, AU - Jordan,Kirsten, AU - Wüstenberg,Torsten, AU - Baudewig,Jürgen, AU - Dechent,Peter, AU - Mast,Fred W, Y1 - 2006/12/21/ PY - 2006/09/07/received PY - 2006/10/18/revised PY - 2006/12/10/accepted PY - 2007/1/30/pubmed PY - 2007/5/2/medline PY - 2007/1/30/entrez SP - 92 EP - 103 JF - Brain research JO - Brain Res. VL - 1137 IS - 1 N2 - The present study examines the functional and anatomical underpinnings of egocentric and allocentric coding of spatial coordinates. For this purpose, we set up a functional magnet resonance imaging experiment using verbal descriptions of spatial relations either with respect to the listener (egocentric) or without any body-centered relations (allocentric) to induce the two different spatial coding strategies. We aimed to identify and distinguish the neuroanatomical correlates of egocentric and allocentric spatial coding without any possible influences by visual stimulation. Results from sixteen participants show a general involvement of a bilateral fronto-parietal network associated with spatial information processing. Furthermore, the egocentric and allocentric conditions gave rise to activations in primary visual areas in both hemispheres. Moreover, data show separate neural circuits mediating different spatial coding strategies. While egocentric spatial coding mainly recruits the precuneus, allocentric coding of space activates a network comprising the right superior and inferior parietal lobe and the ventrolateral occipito-temporal cortex bilaterally. Furthermore, bilateral hippocampal involvement was observed during allocentric, but not during egocentric spatial processing. Our results demonstrate that the processing of egocentric spatial relations is mediated by medial superior-posterior areas, whereas allocentric spatial coding requires an additional involvement of right parietal cortex, the ventral visual stream and the hippocampal formation. These data suggest that a hierarchically organized processing system exists in which the egocentric spatial coding requires only a subsystem of the processing resources of the allocentric condition. SN - 0006-8993 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17258693/The_neural_basis_of_the_egocentric_and_allocentric_spatial_frame_of_reference_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0006-8993(06)03577-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -