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Climate variations and bacillary dysentery in northern and southern cities of China.
J Infect. 2007 Aug; 55(2):194-200.JI

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

This paper was aimed at examining the relationship between meteorological variables and bacillary dysentery in different climatic and geographic areas in China.

METHODS

Jinan in northern China, with a temperate climate, and Baoan in southern China, with a subtropical climate were chosen as study areas. Spearman correlations and seasonal Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (SARIMA) models were used to quantify the association between meteorological variables and dysentery. The Hockey Stick model was used to explore the threshold of the effect of temperatures.

RESULTS

Maximum temperature, minimum temperature, rainfall, relative humidity and air pressure were significantly correlated with the incidence of dysentery in the both cities, with lag effects varying from zero to two months. In the SARIMA models, maximum and minimum temperatures were significantly associated with dysentery transmission. The thresholds for the effects of maximum and minimum temperatures were 17 degrees C and 8 degrees C, respectively, in the northern city. No thresholds were detected in the southern city.

CONCLUSIONS

Climate variations have different impacts on the transmission of bacillary dysentery in temperate and subtropical cities in China. Public health action should be taken at this stage to reduce future risks of climate change with consideration of local climatic conditions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Public Health, University of Adelaide, Level 9, 10 Pulteney Street, Adelaide, SA5005, Australia. ying.zhang@adelaide.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17258812

Citation

Zhang, Ying, et al. "Climate Variations and Bacillary Dysentery in Northern and Southern Cities of China." The Journal of Infection, vol. 55, no. 2, 2007, pp. 194-200.
Zhang Y, Bi P, Hiller JE, et al. Climate variations and bacillary dysentery in northern and southern cities of China. J Infect. 2007;55(2):194-200.
Zhang, Y., Bi, P., Hiller, J. E., Sun, Y., & Ryan, P. (2007). Climate variations and bacillary dysentery in northern and southern cities of China. The Journal of Infection, 55(2), 194-200.
Zhang Y, et al. Climate Variations and Bacillary Dysentery in Northern and Southern Cities of China. J Infect. 2007;55(2):194-200. PubMed PMID: 17258812.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Climate variations and bacillary dysentery in northern and southern cities of China. AU - Zhang,Ying, AU - Bi,Peng, AU - Hiller,Janet E, AU - Sun,Yuwei, AU - Ryan,Philip, Y1 - 2007/01/26/ PY - 2006/10/11/received PY - 2006/12/05/revised PY - 2006/12/06/accepted PY - 2007/1/30/pubmed PY - 2007/8/10/medline PY - 2007/1/30/entrez SP - 194 EP - 200 JF - The Journal of infection JO - J Infect VL - 55 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVES: This paper was aimed at examining the relationship between meteorological variables and bacillary dysentery in different climatic and geographic areas in China. METHODS: Jinan in northern China, with a temperate climate, and Baoan in southern China, with a subtropical climate were chosen as study areas. Spearman correlations and seasonal Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (SARIMA) models were used to quantify the association between meteorological variables and dysentery. The Hockey Stick model was used to explore the threshold of the effect of temperatures. RESULTS: Maximum temperature, minimum temperature, rainfall, relative humidity and air pressure were significantly correlated with the incidence of dysentery in the both cities, with lag effects varying from zero to two months. In the SARIMA models, maximum and minimum temperatures were significantly associated with dysentery transmission. The thresholds for the effects of maximum and minimum temperatures were 17 degrees C and 8 degrees C, respectively, in the northern city. No thresholds were detected in the southern city. CONCLUSIONS: Climate variations have different impacts on the transmission of bacillary dysentery in temperate and subtropical cities in China. Public health action should be taken at this stage to reduce future risks of climate change with consideration of local climatic conditions. SN - 1532-2742 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17258812/Climate_variations_and_bacillary_dysentery_in_northern_and_southern_cities_of_China_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0163-4453(06)00415-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -