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Ethnicity, insulin resistance, and inflammatory adipokines in women at high and low risk for vascular disease.
Diabetes Care. 2007 Feb; 30(2):286-91.DC

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

We sought to compare the relationship between body composition, insulin resistance, and inflammatory adipokines in Aboriginal Canadian women, who are at high risk of vascular disease, with white women.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS

A subgroup of the First Nations Bone Health Study population, consisting of 131 Aboriginal women and 132 matched white women, was utilized. Body composition was determined by whole-body dual X-ray absorptiometry, and blood analytes were measured after an overnight fast.

RESULTS

After excluding individuals with diabetes, A1C, BMI, percent trunk fat, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were greater in First Nation women compared with white women, whereas adiponectin, retinol binding protein (RBP)4, and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) were lower. First Nation women had more trunk fat for any given level of total fat than white women. There were no differences in resistin, leptin, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, or C-reactive protein (CRP) levels between First Nation and white women. Insulin resistance correlated with leptin and inversely with adiponectin levels in both First Nation and white women. There were weak correlations between insulin resistance and TNF-alpha, interleukin-6, and CRP, but these were not significant after correction for body fat. No correlation was found between RBP4 and insulin resistance. ANCOVA revealed a higher HOMA-IR adjusted for total body fat in First Nation women than in white women (P = 0.015) but not HOMA-IR adjusted for trunk fat (P > 0.2).

CONCLUSIONS

First Nation women are more insulin resistant than white women, and this is explained by trunk fat but not total fat. Despite the increased insulin resistance, inflammatory adipokines are not significantly increased in First Nation women compared with white women.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Internal Medicine, University of Manitoba, 715 McDermot Avenue, Winnipeg, R3E 3P4 Canada.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17259496

Citation

Silha, Josef V., et al. "Ethnicity, Insulin Resistance, and Inflammatory Adipokines in Women at High and Low Risk for Vascular Disease." Diabetes Care, vol. 30, no. 2, 2007, pp. 286-91.
Silha JV, Nyomba BL, Leslie WD, et al. Ethnicity, insulin resistance, and inflammatory adipokines in women at high and low risk for vascular disease. Diabetes Care. 2007;30(2):286-91.
Silha, J. V., Nyomba, B. L., Leslie, W. D., & Murphy, L. J. (2007). Ethnicity, insulin resistance, and inflammatory adipokines in women at high and low risk for vascular disease. Diabetes Care, 30(2), 286-91.
Silha JV, et al. Ethnicity, Insulin Resistance, and Inflammatory Adipokines in Women at High and Low Risk for Vascular Disease. Diabetes Care. 2007;30(2):286-91. PubMed PMID: 17259496.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Ethnicity, insulin resistance, and inflammatory adipokines in women at high and low risk for vascular disease. AU - Silha,Josef V, AU - Nyomba,B L Grégoire, AU - Leslie,William D, AU - Murphy,Liam J, PY - 2007/1/30/pubmed PY - 2007/6/15/medline PY - 2007/1/30/entrez SP - 286 EP - 91 JF - Diabetes care JO - Diabetes Care VL - 30 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: We sought to compare the relationship between body composition, insulin resistance, and inflammatory adipokines in Aboriginal Canadian women, who are at high risk of vascular disease, with white women. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A subgroup of the First Nations Bone Health Study population, consisting of 131 Aboriginal women and 132 matched white women, was utilized. Body composition was determined by whole-body dual X-ray absorptiometry, and blood analytes were measured after an overnight fast. RESULTS: After excluding individuals with diabetes, A1C, BMI, percent trunk fat, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were greater in First Nation women compared with white women, whereas adiponectin, retinol binding protein (RBP)4, and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) were lower. First Nation women had more trunk fat for any given level of total fat than white women. There were no differences in resistin, leptin, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, or C-reactive protein (CRP) levels between First Nation and white women. Insulin resistance correlated with leptin and inversely with adiponectin levels in both First Nation and white women. There were weak correlations between insulin resistance and TNF-alpha, interleukin-6, and CRP, but these were not significant after correction for body fat. No correlation was found between RBP4 and insulin resistance. ANCOVA revealed a higher HOMA-IR adjusted for total body fat in First Nation women than in white women (P = 0.015) but not HOMA-IR adjusted for trunk fat (P > 0.2). CONCLUSIONS: First Nation women are more insulin resistant than white women, and this is explained by trunk fat but not total fat. Despite the increased insulin resistance, inflammatory adipokines are not significantly increased in First Nation women compared with white women. SN - 0149-5992 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17259496/Ethnicity_insulin_resistance_and_inflammatory_adipokines_in_women_at_high_and_low_risk_for_vascular_disease_ L2 - http://care.diabetesjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=17259496 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -