Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Scurvy in a 10-month-old boy.

Abstract

We report a 10-month-old boy with inflammatory and necrotic gingival lesions, fever, irritability, and pseudoparalysis of the legs. Laboratory examinations revealed moderate anemia and skeletal X-rays showed osteopenia, scorbutic rosary at the costochondral junctions, and "corner sign" on the proximal metaphyses of the femora. The boy had been fed only with diluted cow's milk. He had never taken solid food, vitamin C, or iron complement. Seventy-two hours after starting oral vitamin C supplementation, there was significant improvement in the patient's gingival lesions and general health. The clinical presentation and laboratory and imaging findings, together with the dramatic response to ascorbic acid intake, allowed us to confirm the diagnosis of infantile scurvy. Scurvy, a dietary disease due to the deficient intake of vitamin C, is uncommon in the pediatric population. In an infant who has never received vitamin C, the combination of gingival lesions, pseudoparalysis, and irritability strongly suggests a diagnosis of scurvy. The clinical picture, together with the laboratory data, radiological studies, and therapeutic response to vitamin C administration, confirmed the diagnosis.

Links

  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Pediatric Dermatology Division and Pediatric Department, Ramos Mejía Hospital, Buenos Aires, Argentina. margaritalarraide@fibertel.com.ar

    , , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Ascorbic Acid
    Folic Acid
    Humans
    Infant
    Iron
    Male
    Scurvy
    Vitamin D

    Pub Type(s)

    Case Reports
    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    17269976

    Citation

    Larralde, Margarita, et al. "Scurvy in a 10-month-old Boy." International Journal of Dermatology, vol. 46, no. 2, 2007, pp. 194-8.
    Larralde M, Santos Muñoz A, Boggio P, et al. Scurvy in a 10-month-old boy. Int J Dermatol. 2007;46(2):194-8.
    Larralde, M., Santos Muñoz, A., Boggio, P., Di Gruccio, V., Weis, I., & Schygiel, A. (2007). Scurvy in a 10-month-old boy. International Journal of Dermatology, 46(2), pp. 194-8.
    Larralde M, et al. Scurvy in a 10-month-old Boy. Int J Dermatol. 2007;46(2):194-8. PubMed PMID: 17269976.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Scurvy in a 10-month-old boy. AU - Larralde,Margarita, AU - Santos Muñoz,Andrea, AU - Boggio,Paula, AU - Di Gruccio,Vanesa, AU - Weis,Isaac, AU - Schygiel,Adolfo, PY - 2007/2/3/pubmed PY - 2007/6/15/medline PY - 2007/2/3/entrez SP - 194 EP - 8 JF - International journal of dermatology JO - Int. J. Dermatol. VL - 46 IS - 2 N2 - We report a 10-month-old boy with inflammatory and necrotic gingival lesions, fever, irritability, and pseudoparalysis of the legs. Laboratory examinations revealed moderate anemia and skeletal X-rays showed osteopenia, scorbutic rosary at the costochondral junctions, and "corner sign" on the proximal metaphyses of the femora. The boy had been fed only with diluted cow's milk. He had never taken solid food, vitamin C, or iron complement. Seventy-two hours after starting oral vitamin C supplementation, there was significant improvement in the patient's gingival lesions and general health. The clinical presentation and laboratory and imaging findings, together with the dramatic response to ascorbic acid intake, allowed us to confirm the diagnosis of infantile scurvy. Scurvy, a dietary disease due to the deficient intake of vitamin C, is uncommon in the pediatric population. In an infant who has never received vitamin C, the combination of gingival lesions, pseudoparalysis, and irritability strongly suggests a diagnosis of scurvy. The clinical picture, together with the laboratory data, radiological studies, and therapeutic response to vitamin C administration, confirmed the diagnosis. SN - 0011-9059 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17269976/Scurvy_in_a_10_month_old_boy_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-4632.2007.02856.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -