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Association between the metabolic syndrome and chronic kidney disease in Chinese adults.
Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2007 Apr; 22(4):1100-6.ND

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The metabolic syndrome is a common risk factor for cardiovascular and chronic kidney disease (CKD) in Western populations. We examined the relationship between the metabolic syndrome and risk of CKD in Chinese adults.

METHODS

A cross-sectional survey was conducted in a nationally representative sample of 15 160 Chinese adults aged 35-74 years. The metabolic syndrome was defined as the presence of three or more of the following risk factors: elevated blood pressure, low high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol, high triglycerides, elevated plasma glucose and abdominal obesity. CKD was defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate<60 ml/min/1.73 m2 and elevated serum creatinine was defined as >or=1.14 mg/dl in men and >or=0.97 mg/dl in women (>or=95th percentile of serum creatinine in Chinese men and women aged 35-44 years without hypertension or diabetes, respectively).

RESULTS

The multivariate-adjusted odds ratios [95% confidence interval (CI)] of CKD and elevated serum creatinine in participants with compared to those without the metabolic syndrome were 1.64 (1.16, 2.32) and 1.36 (1.07, 1.73), respectively. Compared to participants without any components of the metabolic syndrome, the multivariate-adjusted odds ratios (95% CI) of CKD were 1.51 (1.02, 2.23), 1.50 (0.97, 2.32), 2.13 (1.30, 3.50) and 2.72 (1.50, 4.93) for those with 1, 2, 3, and 4 or 5 components, respectively. The corresponding multivariate-adjusted odds ratios (95% CI) of elevated serum creatinine were 1.11 (0.88, 1.40), 1.39 (1.07, 2.04), 1.47 (1.06, 2.04) and 2.00 (1.32, 3.03), respectively.

CONCLUSIONS

These findings suggest that the metabolic syndrome might be an important risk factor for CKD in Chinese adults.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Tulane University School of Medicine, 1430 Tulane Avenue, SL-45, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA, and the Cardiovascular Institute and Fuwai Hospital, Beijing, China. jchen@tulane.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17272313

Citation

Chen, Jing, et al. "Association Between the Metabolic Syndrome and Chronic Kidney Disease in Chinese Adults." Nephrology, Dialysis, Transplantation : Official Publication of the European Dialysis and Transplant Association - European Renal Association, vol. 22, no. 4, 2007, pp. 1100-6.
Chen J, Gu D, Chen CS, et al. Association between the metabolic syndrome and chronic kidney disease in Chinese adults. Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2007;22(4):1100-6.
Chen, J., Gu, D., Chen, C. S., Wu, X., Hamm, L. L., Muntner, P., Batuman, V., Lee, C. H., Whelton, P. K., & He, J. (2007). Association between the metabolic syndrome and chronic kidney disease in Chinese adults. Nephrology, Dialysis, Transplantation : Official Publication of the European Dialysis and Transplant Association - European Renal Association, 22(4), 1100-6.
Chen J, et al. Association Between the Metabolic Syndrome and Chronic Kidney Disease in Chinese Adults. Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2007;22(4):1100-6. PubMed PMID: 17272313.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association between the metabolic syndrome and chronic kidney disease in Chinese adults. AU - Chen,Jing, AU - Gu,Dongfeng, AU - Chen,Chung-Shiuan, AU - Wu,Xigui, AU - Hamm,L Lee, AU - Muntner,Paul, AU - Batuman,Vecihi, AU - Lee,Chien-Hung, AU - Whelton,Paul K, AU - He,Jiang, Y1 - 2007/02/01/ PY - 2007/2/3/pubmed PY - 2007/7/25/medline PY - 2007/2/3/entrez SP - 1100 EP - 6 JF - Nephrology, dialysis, transplantation : official publication of the European Dialysis and Transplant Association - European Renal Association JO - Nephrol Dial Transplant VL - 22 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: The metabolic syndrome is a common risk factor for cardiovascular and chronic kidney disease (CKD) in Western populations. We examined the relationship between the metabolic syndrome and risk of CKD in Chinese adults. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in a nationally representative sample of 15 160 Chinese adults aged 35-74 years. The metabolic syndrome was defined as the presence of three or more of the following risk factors: elevated blood pressure, low high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol, high triglycerides, elevated plasma glucose and abdominal obesity. CKD was defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate<60 ml/min/1.73 m2 and elevated serum creatinine was defined as >or=1.14 mg/dl in men and >or=0.97 mg/dl in women (>or=95th percentile of serum creatinine in Chinese men and women aged 35-44 years without hypertension or diabetes, respectively). RESULTS: The multivariate-adjusted odds ratios [95% confidence interval (CI)] of CKD and elevated serum creatinine in participants with compared to those without the metabolic syndrome were 1.64 (1.16, 2.32) and 1.36 (1.07, 1.73), respectively. Compared to participants without any components of the metabolic syndrome, the multivariate-adjusted odds ratios (95% CI) of CKD were 1.51 (1.02, 2.23), 1.50 (0.97, 2.32), 2.13 (1.30, 3.50) and 2.72 (1.50, 4.93) for those with 1, 2, 3, and 4 or 5 components, respectively. The corresponding multivariate-adjusted odds ratios (95% CI) of elevated serum creatinine were 1.11 (0.88, 1.40), 1.39 (1.07, 2.04), 1.47 (1.06, 2.04) and 2.00 (1.32, 3.03), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that the metabolic syndrome might be an important risk factor for CKD in Chinese adults. SN - 0931-0509 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17272313/Association_between_the_metabolic_syndrome_and_chronic_kidney_disease_in_Chinese_adults_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ndt/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ndt/gfl759 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -