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Relations of changes in exercise self-efficacy, physical self-concept, and body satisfaction with weight changes in obese white and African American women initiating a physical activity program.
Ethn Dis. 2007 Winter; 17(1):19-22.ED

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the effectiveness of changes in factors associated with self-efficacy theory for predicting weight change in obese women of two ethnic groups.

DESIGN

Obese (body mass index [BMI] > or = 30 kg/m2) White (n = 34) and African American (n = 30) women (mean age 44 years) were assessed on measures of body satisfaction, self-efficacy, and weight change over 20 weeks.

SETTING

Community wellness centers.

INTERVENTION

A supported exercise and nutrition information treatment.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Changes in Body Areas Satisfaction Scale (BAS), Physical Self-Concept Scale (PSCS), and Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale (ESES) scores and changes in body weight over 20 weeks.

RESULTS

Significant improvements were found on measures of exercise self-efficacy, body satisfaction, and weight, with a trend (P = .073) toward significantly greater mean weight loss by the White group (-15.5 kg vs -9.1 kg). Linear multiple regression analyses, with simultaneous entry of changes in BAS, PSCS, and ESES scores, significantly predicted changes in weight for both the White (R2 = .25) and African American (R2 = .50) group. The primary predictor of weight change for the White group was change in BAS scores (beta = -.42) and for the African American group was change in ESES scores (beta = -.68).

CONCLUSIONS

Self-efficacy theory was supported as an explanatory model for both groups, with notable differences. Implications for weight loss intervention design and application are discussed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Wellness Department, YMCA of Metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia, USA. jamesa@ymcaatlanta.org

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17274204

Citation

Annesi, James J.. "Relations of Changes in Exercise Self-efficacy, Physical Self-concept, and Body Satisfaction With Weight Changes in Obese White and African American Women Initiating a Physical Activity Program." Ethnicity & Disease, vol. 17, no. 1, 2007, pp. 19-22.
Annesi JJ. Relations of changes in exercise self-efficacy, physical self-concept, and body satisfaction with weight changes in obese white and African American women initiating a physical activity program. Ethn Dis. 2007;17(1):19-22.
Annesi, J. J. (2007). Relations of changes in exercise self-efficacy, physical self-concept, and body satisfaction with weight changes in obese white and African American women initiating a physical activity program. Ethnicity & Disease, 17(1), 19-22.
Annesi JJ. Relations of Changes in Exercise Self-efficacy, Physical Self-concept, and Body Satisfaction With Weight Changes in Obese White and African American Women Initiating a Physical Activity Program. Ethn Dis. 2007;17(1):19-22. PubMed PMID: 17274204.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Relations of changes in exercise self-efficacy, physical self-concept, and body satisfaction with weight changes in obese white and African American women initiating a physical activity program. A1 - Annesi,James J, PY - 2007/2/6/pubmed PY - 2007/3/7/medline PY - 2007/2/6/entrez SP - 19 EP - 22 JF - Ethnicity & disease JO - Ethn Dis VL - 17 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine the effectiveness of changes in factors associated with self-efficacy theory for predicting weight change in obese women of two ethnic groups. DESIGN: Obese (body mass index [BMI] > or = 30 kg/m2) White (n = 34) and African American (n = 30) women (mean age 44 years) were assessed on measures of body satisfaction, self-efficacy, and weight change over 20 weeks. SETTING: Community wellness centers. INTERVENTION: A supported exercise and nutrition information treatment. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Changes in Body Areas Satisfaction Scale (BAS), Physical Self-Concept Scale (PSCS), and Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale (ESES) scores and changes in body weight over 20 weeks. RESULTS: Significant improvements were found on measures of exercise self-efficacy, body satisfaction, and weight, with a trend (P = .073) toward significantly greater mean weight loss by the White group (-15.5 kg vs -9.1 kg). Linear multiple regression analyses, with simultaneous entry of changes in BAS, PSCS, and ESES scores, significantly predicted changes in weight for both the White (R2 = .25) and African American (R2 = .50) group. The primary predictor of weight change for the White group was change in BAS scores (beta = -.42) and for the African American group was change in ESES scores (beta = -.68). CONCLUSIONS: Self-efficacy theory was supported as an explanatory model for both groups, with notable differences. Implications for weight loss intervention design and application are discussed. SN - 1049-510X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17274204/Relations_of_changes_in_exercise_self_efficacy_physical_self_concept_and_body_satisfaction_with_weight_changes_in_obese_white_and_African_American_women_initiating_a_physical_activity_program_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/obesity.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -