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Lower red blood cell folate enhances the HPV-16-associated risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.
Nutrition 2007; 23(3):203-10N

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

We previously reported that higher circulating concentrations of folate are independently associated with a lower likelihood of becoming positive for high-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPVs) and of having a persistent HR-HPV infection and a greater likelihood of becoming HR-HPV negative (Cancer Res 2004;64:8788-93). In the present study conducted in the same study population, we tested whether circulating folate concentrations modify the risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) > or =2 associated with specific types of HR-HPV.

METHODS

Multiple logistic regression models were used to assess associations (odds ratio with 95% confidence intervals) across HR-HPV, folate, and rigorously reviewed cervical histology of each subject.

RESULTS

HPV-16-positive women with low red blood cell folate were significantly more likely to be diagnosed with CIN > or =2 than were HPV-16-negative women with higher red blood cell folate (odds ratio 9, 95% confidence interval 3.3-24.8).

CONCLUSION

To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting an independent association of folate with risk of having CIN > or =2 in a population tested extensively for HR-HPV and CIN that also adequately controlled for several other micronutrients and known risk factors for CIN. Our findings suggest that improving the folate status in HR-HPV-infected women may reduce the risk of CIN and thus the risk of cervical cancer. Folate supplementation should be tested as a means of reducing the risk of developing CIN > or =2 in women exposed to HR-HPV, especially HPV-16.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition Sciences, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17276035

Citation

Piyathilake, Chandrika J., et al. "Lower Red Blood Cell Folate Enhances the HPV-16-associated Risk of Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia." Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.), vol. 23, no. 3, 2007, pp. 203-10.
Piyathilake CJ, Macaluso M, Brill I, et al. Lower red blood cell folate enhances the HPV-16-associated risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. Nutrition. 2007;23(3):203-10.
Piyathilake, C. J., Macaluso, M., Brill, I., Heimburger, D. C., & Partridge, E. E. (2007). Lower red blood cell folate enhances the HPV-16-associated risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.), 23(3), pp. 203-10.
Piyathilake CJ, et al. Lower Red Blood Cell Folate Enhances the HPV-16-associated Risk of Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia. Nutrition. 2007;23(3):203-10. PubMed PMID: 17276035.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Lower red blood cell folate enhances the HPV-16-associated risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. AU - Piyathilake,Chandrika J, AU - Macaluso,Maurizio, AU - Brill,Ilene, AU - Heimburger,Douglas C, AU - Partridge,Edward E, Y1 - 2007/02/01/ PY - 2006/09/06/received PY - 2006/11/29/revised PY - 2006/12/06/accepted PY - 2007/2/6/pubmed PY - 2007/5/30/medline PY - 2007/2/6/entrez SP - 203 EP - 10 JF - Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.) JO - Nutrition VL - 23 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: We previously reported that higher circulating concentrations of folate are independently associated with a lower likelihood of becoming positive for high-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPVs) and of having a persistent HR-HPV infection and a greater likelihood of becoming HR-HPV negative (Cancer Res 2004;64:8788-93). In the present study conducted in the same study population, we tested whether circulating folate concentrations modify the risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) > or =2 associated with specific types of HR-HPV. METHODS: Multiple logistic regression models were used to assess associations (odds ratio with 95% confidence intervals) across HR-HPV, folate, and rigorously reviewed cervical histology of each subject. RESULTS: HPV-16-positive women with low red blood cell folate were significantly more likely to be diagnosed with CIN > or =2 than were HPV-16-negative women with higher red blood cell folate (odds ratio 9, 95% confidence interval 3.3-24.8). CONCLUSION: To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting an independent association of folate with risk of having CIN > or =2 in a population tested extensively for HR-HPV and CIN that also adequately controlled for several other micronutrients and known risk factors for CIN. Our findings suggest that improving the folate status in HR-HPV-infected women may reduce the risk of CIN and thus the risk of cervical cancer. Folate supplementation should be tested as a means of reducing the risk of developing CIN > or =2 in women exposed to HR-HPV, especially HPV-16. SN - 0899-9007 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17276035/Lower_red_blood_cell_folate_enhances_the_HPV_16_associated_risk_of_cervical_intraepithelial_neoplasia_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0899-9007(06)00419-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -