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Plasma homocysteine levels in patients treated with levodopa: motor and cognitive associations.
Neurol Res. 2006 Dec; 28(8):853-8.NR

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this study was to determine whether hyperhomocysteinemia caused by levodopa used in idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) is associated with cognitive or physical impairments. The role of folate and vitamin B12 levels in this context was also ascertained.

METHODS

Thirty-nine patients who had been followed with the diagnosis of IPD in our clinic for > 2 years and 28 healthy control subjects with similar demographic features were included in the study. The homocysteine, folic acid and vitamin B12 levels and the results of the short test of mental status (STMS) and the clock drawing test of IPD patients were compared with those of the controls. Subsequently, the patients with a homocysteine level of >14 micromol/l were compared with those having a homocysteine level of <14 micromol/l by means of detailed neuropsychometric test batteries.

RESULTS

Homocysteine levels were significantly higher in the patient group in comparison with the controls. There was a negative correlation between hyperhomocysteinemia and the levels of vitamin B12 and folate. On the other hand, a positive correlation between hyperhomocysteinemia and the levodopa dose was detected. There was a positive correlation between hyperhomocysteinemia and unified Parkinson's disease rating scale (UPDRS) motor section. The critical dose of levodopa was observed to be 300 mg/d. In terms of cognitive and frontal functions, no significant difference was detected between the patients and control group. The subgroup with a homocysteine level of >14 micromol/l had a significantly poorer performance in frontal and memory tests.

DISCUSSION

In patients with IPD who are detected to have hyperhomocysteinemia, the assessment of the cognitive performance, folic acid and vitamin B12 levels and the supplementation of folic acid and vitamin B12 to the treatment regimen might be appropriate.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurology, Haseki Educational and Research Hospital, Turkey. ffozer@yahoo.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17288745

Citation

Ozer, Feriha, et al. "Plasma Homocysteine Levels in Patients Treated With Levodopa: Motor and Cognitive Associations." Neurological Research, vol. 28, no. 8, 2006, pp. 853-8.
Ozer F, Meral H, Hanoglu L, et al. Plasma homocysteine levels in patients treated with levodopa: motor and cognitive associations. Neurol Res. 2006;28(8):853-8.
Ozer, F., Meral, H., Hanoglu, L., Aydemir, T., Yilsen, M., Cetin, S., Ozturk, O., Seval, H., & Koldas, M. (2006). Plasma homocysteine levels in patients treated with levodopa: motor and cognitive associations. Neurological Research, 28(8), 853-8.
Ozer F, et al. Plasma Homocysteine Levels in Patients Treated With Levodopa: Motor and Cognitive Associations. Neurol Res. 2006;28(8):853-8. PubMed PMID: 17288745.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Plasma homocysteine levels in patients treated with levodopa: motor and cognitive associations. AU - Ozer,Feriha, AU - Meral,Hasan, AU - Hanoglu,Lutfu, AU - Aydemir,Tuba, AU - Yilsen,Meral, AU - Cetin,Sibel, AU - Ozturk,Oya, AU - Seval,Hatice, AU - Koldas,Macit, PY - 2007/2/10/pubmed PY - 2007/3/22/medline PY - 2007/2/10/entrez SP - 853 EP - 8 JF - Neurological research JO - Neurol Res VL - 28 IS - 8 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine whether hyperhomocysteinemia caused by levodopa used in idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) is associated with cognitive or physical impairments. The role of folate and vitamin B12 levels in this context was also ascertained. METHODS: Thirty-nine patients who had been followed with the diagnosis of IPD in our clinic for > 2 years and 28 healthy control subjects with similar demographic features were included in the study. The homocysteine, folic acid and vitamin B12 levels and the results of the short test of mental status (STMS) and the clock drawing test of IPD patients were compared with those of the controls. Subsequently, the patients with a homocysteine level of >14 micromol/l were compared with those having a homocysteine level of <14 micromol/l by means of detailed neuropsychometric test batteries. RESULTS: Homocysteine levels were significantly higher in the patient group in comparison with the controls. There was a negative correlation between hyperhomocysteinemia and the levels of vitamin B12 and folate. On the other hand, a positive correlation between hyperhomocysteinemia and the levodopa dose was detected. There was a positive correlation between hyperhomocysteinemia and unified Parkinson's disease rating scale (UPDRS) motor section. The critical dose of levodopa was observed to be 300 mg/d. In terms of cognitive and frontal functions, no significant difference was detected between the patients and control group. The subgroup with a homocysteine level of >14 micromol/l had a significantly poorer performance in frontal and memory tests. DISCUSSION: In patients with IPD who are detected to have hyperhomocysteinemia, the assessment of the cognitive performance, folic acid and vitamin B12 levels and the supplementation of folic acid and vitamin B12 to the treatment regimen might be appropriate. SN - 0161-6412 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17288745/Plasma_homocysteine_levels_in_patients_treated_with_levodopa:_motor_and_cognitive_associations_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1179/016164106X110445 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -