Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Fatigue in aviation.
Travel Med Infect Dis. 2005 May; 3(2):85-96.TM

Abstract

Pilot fatigue is a significant, but often under-reported problem in both civilian and military aviation operations. Although estimates vary, official statistics indicate that fatigue is involved in at least 4-8% of aviation mishaps, and surveys of pilots and aircrew members reveal that fatigue is an important concern throughout today's 24/7 flight operations. Regulatory efforts aimed at limiting flight hours and ensuring at least minimal periods of crew rest have to some extent mitigated fatigue-related difficulties in the cockpit, but it is clear that much remains to be done about this insidious threat to air safety. Scheduling factors, sleep deprivation, circadian disruptions, and extended duty periods continue to challenge the alertness and performance levels of both short-haul and long-haul pilots and crews. Solutions for these problems are not straightforward, but they can be developed through the cooperative efforts of scientists, regulators, managers, and the pilots themselves. Over the past 20 years, scientific understanding of human sleep, fatigue, and circadian rhythms has expanded considerably. The thorough integration of this new knowledge into modern crew-resource management practices will facilitate the establishment of optimal crew scheduling routines and the implementation of valid aviation fatigue countermeasures.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Aviation Sustained Operations Team, Fatigue Countermeasures Branch, Air Force Research Laboratory, 2485 Gillingham Drive, Brooks City-Base, TX 78235, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17292011

Citation

Caldwell, John A.. "Fatigue in Aviation." Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease, vol. 3, no. 2, 2005, pp. 85-96.
Caldwell JA. Fatigue in aviation. Travel Med Infect Dis. 2005;3(2):85-96.
Caldwell, J. A. (2005). Fatigue in aviation. Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease, 3(2), 85-96.
Caldwell JA. Fatigue in Aviation. Travel Med Infect Dis. 2005;3(2):85-96. PubMed PMID: 17292011.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fatigue in aviation. A1 - Caldwell,John A, PY - 2004/07/21/received PY - 2004/07/26/accepted PY - 2007/2/13/pubmed PY - 2007/2/13/medline PY - 2007/2/13/entrez SP - 85 EP - 96 JF - Travel medicine and infectious disease JO - Travel Med Infect Dis VL - 3 IS - 2 N2 - Pilot fatigue is a significant, but often under-reported problem in both civilian and military aviation operations. Although estimates vary, official statistics indicate that fatigue is involved in at least 4-8% of aviation mishaps, and surveys of pilots and aircrew members reveal that fatigue is an important concern throughout today's 24/7 flight operations. Regulatory efforts aimed at limiting flight hours and ensuring at least minimal periods of crew rest have to some extent mitigated fatigue-related difficulties in the cockpit, but it is clear that much remains to be done about this insidious threat to air safety. Scheduling factors, sleep deprivation, circadian disruptions, and extended duty periods continue to challenge the alertness and performance levels of both short-haul and long-haul pilots and crews. Solutions for these problems are not straightforward, but they can be developed through the cooperative efforts of scientists, regulators, managers, and the pilots themselves. Over the past 20 years, scientific understanding of human sleep, fatigue, and circadian rhythms has expanded considerably. The thorough integration of this new knowledge into modern crew-resource management practices will facilitate the establishment of optimal crew scheduling routines and the implementation of valid aviation fatigue countermeasures. SN - 1477-8939 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17292011/Fatigue_in_aviation_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1477-8939(04)00101-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
Try the Free App:
Prime PubMed app for iOS iPhone iPad
Prime PubMed app for Android
Prime PubMed is provided
free to individuals by:
Unbound Medicine.