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Enhanced cortisol suppression in response to dexamethasone administration in traumatized veterans with and without posttraumatic stress disorder.
Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2007 Apr; 32(3):215-26.P

Abstract

BACKGROUND

While enhanced cortisol suppression in response to dexamethasone is one of the most consistent biological findings in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), the relative contribution of trauma exposure to this finding remains unclear.

METHODS

Assessment of diurnal salivary cortisol levels and 1600 h salivary cortisol before and after oral administration of 0.5mg dexamethasone in veterans with PTSD, veterans without PTSD (trauma controls) and healthy controls. Assessment of 1600 h plasma cortisol, ACTH and corticotrophin binding globulin (CBG) in response to dexamethasone in PTSD patients and trauma controls.

RESULTS

Both PTSD patients and trauma controls demonstrated significantly more salivary cortisol suppression compared to healthy controls. Salivary cortisol, plasma cortisol and ACTH suppression as well as CBG levels did not differ between PTSD patients and trauma controls. PTSD patients showed a reduced awakening cortisol response (ACR) compared to healthy controls that correlated significantly with PTSD symptoms. No significant differences were observed in ACR between PTSD patients and trauma controls.

CONCLUSIONS

These data suggest that enhanced cortisol suppression to dexamethasone is related to trauma exposure and not specifically to PTSD. The correlation between the ACR and PTSD severity suggests that a flattened ACR may be a result of clinical symptoms.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Military Psychiatry, Central Military Hospital, Utrecht, The Netherlands. c.s.dekloet@umcutrecht.nl <c.s.dekloet@umcutrecht.nl>No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17296270

Citation

de Kloet, C S., et al. "Enhanced Cortisol Suppression in Response to Dexamethasone Administration in Traumatized Veterans With and Without Posttraumatic Stress Disorder." Psychoneuroendocrinology, vol. 32, no. 3, 2007, pp. 215-26.
de Kloet CS, Vermetten E, Heijnen CJ, et al. Enhanced cortisol suppression in response to dexamethasone administration in traumatized veterans with and without posttraumatic stress disorder. Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2007;32(3):215-26.
de Kloet, C. S., Vermetten, E., Heijnen, C. J., Geuze, E., Lentjes, E. G., & Westenberg, H. G. (2007). Enhanced cortisol suppression in response to dexamethasone administration in traumatized veterans with and without posttraumatic stress disorder. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 32(3), 215-26.
de Kloet CS, et al. Enhanced Cortisol Suppression in Response to Dexamethasone Administration in Traumatized Veterans With and Without Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2007;32(3):215-26. PubMed PMID: 17296270.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Enhanced cortisol suppression in response to dexamethasone administration in traumatized veterans with and without posttraumatic stress disorder. AU - de Kloet,C S, AU - Vermetten,E, AU - Heijnen,C J, AU - Geuze,E, AU - Lentjes,E G W M, AU - Westenberg,H G M, Y1 - 2007/02/12/ PY - 2006/08/02/received PY - 2006/11/29/revised PY - 2006/12/09/accepted PY - 2007/2/14/pubmed PY - 2007/6/6/medline PY - 2007/2/14/entrez SP - 215 EP - 26 JF - Psychoneuroendocrinology JO - Psychoneuroendocrinology VL - 32 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: While enhanced cortisol suppression in response to dexamethasone is one of the most consistent biological findings in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), the relative contribution of trauma exposure to this finding remains unclear. METHODS: Assessment of diurnal salivary cortisol levels and 1600 h salivary cortisol before and after oral administration of 0.5mg dexamethasone in veterans with PTSD, veterans without PTSD (trauma controls) and healthy controls. Assessment of 1600 h plasma cortisol, ACTH and corticotrophin binding globulin (CBG) in response to dexamethasone in PTSD patients and trauma controls. RESULTS: Both PTSD patients and trauma controls demonstrated significantly more salivary cortisol suppression compared to healthy controls. Salivary cortisol, plasma cortisol and ACTH suppression as well as CBG levels did not differ between PTSD patients and trauma controls. PTSD patients showed a reduced awakening cortisol response (ACR) compared to healthy controls that correlated significantly with PTSD symptoms. No significant differences were observed in ACR between PTSD patients and trauma controls. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that enhanced cortisol suppression to dexamethasone is related to trauma exposure and not specifically to PTSD. The correlation between the ACR and PTSD severity suggests that a flattened ACR may be a result of clinical symptoms. SN - 0306-4530 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17296270/Enhanced_cortisol_suppression_in_response_to_dexamethasone_administration_in_traumatized_veterans_with_and_without_posttraumatic_stress_disorder_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -