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Exposure to secondhand smoke and biomarkers of cardiovascular disease risk in never-smoking adults.
Circulation. 2007 Feb 27; 115(8):990-5.Circ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Exposure to secondhand smoke has been associated with a disproportionately high risk of coronary heart disease, thought to be mediated through inflammation, platelet aggregation, and/or endothelial dysfunction. The epidemiological association between objectively measured exposure to secondhand smoke and biomarkers of heart disease risk has not been investigated, however.

METHODS AND RESULTS

We have investigated the cross-sectional relation between secondhand smoke exposure, measured objectively as cotinine, and recognized biomarkers of heart disease risk, namely C-reactive protein, homocysteine, fibrinogen, and white blood cell count, in 7599 never-smoking adults from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Compared with subjects with no detectable cotinine, those with detectable but low-level cotinine (range, 0.05 to 0.215 ng/mL) had significantly higher levels of both fibrinogen (adjusted mean difference, 8.9 mg/dL; 95% CI, 0.9 to 17.0; P=0.03) and homocysteine (0.8 micromol/L; 95% CI, 0.4 to 1.1; P<0.001) but not C-reactive protein or white blood cell count. Effect estimates of similar magnitude and significance were seen in subjects in the high category of cotinine exposure (>0.215 ng/mL). The increased levels of fibrinogen and homocysteine seen in relation to secondhand smoke exposure were equivalent to approximately 30% to 45% of those seen for active smoking.

CONCLUSIONS

Passive smokers appear to have disproportionately increased levels of 2 biomarkers of cardiovascular disease risk, fibrinogen and homocysteine. This finding provides further evidence to suggest that low-level exposure to secondhand smoke has a clinically important effect on susceptibility to cardiovascular disease.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Nottingham, Clinical Sciences Bldg, City Hospital, Nottingham, NG5 1PB, UK. andrea.venn@nottingham.ac.ukNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17296856

Citation

Venn, Andrea, and John Britton. "Exposure to Secondhand Smoke and Biomarkers of Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Never-smoking Adults." Circulation, vol. 115, no. 8, 2007, pp. 990-5.
Venn A, Britton J. Exposure to secondhand smoke and biomarkers of cardiovascular disease risk in never-smoking adults. Circulation. 2007;115(8):990-5.
Venn, A., & Britton, J. (2007). Exposure to secondhand smoke and biomarkers of cardiovascular disease risk in never-smoking adults. Circulation, 115(8), 990-5.
Venn A, Britton J. Exposure to Secondhand Smoke and Biomarkers of Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Never-smoking Adults. Circulation. 2007 Feb 27;115(8):990-5. PubMed PMID: 17296856.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Exposure to secondhand smoke and biomarkers of cardiovascular disease risk in never-smoking adults. AU - Venn,Andrea, AU - Britton,John, Y1 - 2007/02/12/ PY - 2007/2/14/pubmed PY - 2007/3/14/medline PY - 2007/2/14/entrez SP - 990 EP - 5 JF - Circulation JO - Circulation VL - 115 IS - 8 N2 - BACKGROUND: Exposure to secondhand smoke has been associated with a disproportionately high risk of coronary heart disease, thought to be mediated through inflammation, platelet aggregation, and/or endothelial dysfunction. The epidemiological association between objectively measured exposure to secondhand smoke and biomarkers of heart disease risk has not been investigated, however. METHODS AND RESULTS: We have investigated the cross-sectional relation between secondhand smoke exposure, measured objectively as cotinine, and recognized biomarkers of heart disease risk, namely C-reactive protein, homocysteine, fibrinogen, and white blood cell count, in 7599 never-smoking adults from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Compared with subjects with no detectable cotinine, those with detectable but low-level cotinine (range, 0.05 to 0.215 ng/mL) had significantly higher levels of both fibrinogen (adjusted mean difference, 8.9 mg/dL; 95% CI, 0.9 to 17.0; P=0.03) and homocysteine (0.8 micromol/L; 95% CI, 0.4 to 1.1; P<0.001) but not C-reactive protein or white blood cell count. Effect estimates of similar magnitude and significance were seen in subjects in the high category of cotinine exposure (>0.215 ng/mL). The increased levels of fibrinogen and homocysteine seen in relation to secondhand smoke exposure were equivalent to approximately 30% to 45% of those seen for active smoking. CONCLUSIONS: Passive smokers appear to have disproportionately increased levels of 2 biomarkers of cardiovascular disease risk, fibrinogen and homocysteine. This finding provides further evidence to suggest that low-level exposure to secondhand smoke has a clinically important effect on susceptibility to cardiovascular disease. SN - 1524-4539 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17296856/Exposure_to_secondhand_smoke_and_biomarkers_of_cardiovascular_disease_risk_in_never_smoking_adults_ L2 - https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.106.648469?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -