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Cross-reactive neuraminidase antibodies afford partial protection against H5N1 in mice and are present in unexposed humans.
PLoS Med. 2007 Feb; 4(2):e59.PM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

A pandemic H5N1 influenza outbreak would be facilitated by an absence of immunity to the avian-derived virus in the human population. Although this condition is likely in regard to hemagglutinin-mediated immunity, the neuraminidase (NA) of H5N1 viruses (avN1) and of endemic human H1N1 viruses (huN1) are classified in the same serotype. We hypothesized that an immune response to huN1 could mediate cross-protection against H5N1 influenza virus infection.

METHODS AND FINDINGS

Mice were immunized against the NA of a contemporary human H1N1 strain by DNA vaccination. They were challenged with recombinant A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) viruses bearing huN1 (PR8-huN1) or avN1 (PR8-avN1) or with H5N1 virus A/Vietnam/1203/04. Additional naïve mice were injected with sera from vaccinated mice prior to H5N1 challenge. Also, serum specimens from humans were analyzed for reactivity with avN1. Immunization elicited a serum IgG response to huN1 and robust protection against the homologous challenge virus. Immunized mice were partially protected from lethal challenge with H5N1 virus or recombinant PR8-avN1. Sera transferred from immunized mice to naïve animals conferred similar protection against H5N1 mortality. Analysis of human sera showed that antibodies able to inhibit the sialidase activity of avN1 exist in some individuals.

CONCLUSIONS

These data reveal that humoral immunity elicited by huN1 can partially protect against H5N1 infection in a mammalian host. Our results suggest that a portion of the human population could have some degree of resistance to H5N1 influenza, with the possibility that this could be induced or enhanced through immunization with seasonal influenza vaccines.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Infectious Diseases, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee, United States of America.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17298168

Citation

Sandbulte, Matthew R., et al. "Cross-reactive Neuraminidase Antibodies Afford Partial Protection Against H5N1 in Mice and Are Present in Unexposed Humans." PLoS Medicine, vol. 4, no. 2, 2007, pp. e59.
Sandbulte MR, Jimenez GS, Boon AC, et al. Cross-reactive neuraminidase antibodies afford partial protection against H5N1 in mice and are present in unexposed humans. PLoS Med. 2007;4(2):e59.
Sandbulte, M. R., Jimenez, G. S., Boon, A. C., Smith, L. R., Treanor, J. J., & Webby, R. J. (2007). Cross-reactive neuraminidase antibodies afford partial protection against H5N1 in mice and are present in unexposed humans. PLoS Medicine, 4(2), e59.
Sandbulte MR, et al. Cross-reactive Neuraminidase Antibodies Afford Partial Protection Against H5N1 in Mice and Are Present in Unexposed Humans. PLoS Med. 2007;4(2):e59. PubMed PMID: 17298168.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cross-reactive neuraminidase antibodies afford partial protection against H5N1 in mice and are present in unexposed humans. AU - Sandbulte,Matthew R, AU - Jimenez,Gretchen S, AU - Boon,Adrianus C M, AU - Smith,Larry R, AU - Treanor,John J, AU - Webby,Richard J, PY - 2006/9/29/received PY - 2006/12/20/accepted PY - 2007/2/15/pubmed PY - 2007/9/27/medline PY - 2007/2/15/entrez SP - e59 EP - e59 JF - PLoS medicine JO - PLoS Med VL - 4 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: A pandemic H5N1 influenza outbreak would be facilitated by an absence of immunity to the avian-derived virus in the human population. Although this condition is likely in regard to hemagglutinin-mediated immunity, the neuraminidase (NA) of H5N1 viruses (avN1) and of endemic human H1N1 viruses (huN1) are classified in the same serotype. We hypothesized that an immune response to huN1 could mediate cross-protection against H5N1 influenza virus infection. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Mice were immunized against the NA of a contemporary human H1N1 strain by DNA vaccination. They were challenged with recombinant A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) viruses bearing huN1 (PR8-huN1) or avN1 (PR8-avN1) or with H5N1 virus A/Vietnam/1203/04. Additional naïve mice were injected with sera from vaccinated mice prior to H5N1 challenge. Also, serum specimens from humans were analyzed for reactivity with avN1. Immunization elicited a serum IgG response to huN1 and robust protection against the homologous challenge virus. Immunized mice were partially protected from lethal challenge with H5N1 virus or recombinant PR8-avN1. Sera transferred from immunized mice to naïve animals conferred similar protection against H5N1 mortality. Analysis of human sera showed that antibodies able to inhibit the sialidase activity of avN1 exist in some individuals. CONCLUSIONS: These data reveal that humoral immunity elicited by huN1 can partially protect against H5N1 infection in a mammalian host. Our results suggest that a portion of the human population could have some degree of resistance to H5N1 influenza, with the possibility that this could be induced or enhanced through immunization with seasonal influenza vaccines. SN - 1549-1676 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17298168/Cross_reactive_neuraminidase_antibodies_afford_partial_protection_against_H5N1_in_mice_and_are_present_in_unexposed_humans_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -