Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Better dietary adherence and weight maintenance achieved by a long-term moderate-fat diet.
Br J Nutr 2007; 97(2):399-404BJ

Abstract

The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of a long-term moderate-fat diet (30 % energy from fat) v. a low-fat one (20 % energy from fat) on metabolic risks. The study was a randomised, prospective 14-month trial on overweight and obese patients (eighty-nine overweight and obese men and women). The intervention was a moderate-fat diet (30 % energy) or a low-fat diet (20 % energy). The main outcome measurements were change in body weight, waist circumference, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, total cholesterol, TAG, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Forty-five subjects on the moderate-fat diet and forty-four subjects on the low-fat one were studied. Characteristics of all randomised participants were similar in both groups. After 7 months, the moderate- and low-fat diets had similar effects on cardiovascular risks. The moderate-fat diet was more successful after 14 months in reducing weight (-5.0 (SD 2.5) kg in the moderate-fat group v. -1.2 (SD 1.1) kg in the low-fat one; P < 0.0001), waist circumference (-5.5 (SD 2.4) cm in the moderate-fat group v. - 2.3 (SD 1.3) cm in the low-fat one; P < 0.0001), and other cardiovascular risk factors as well (LDL, TAG, total cholesterol and systolic blood pressure). In conclusion, a moderate-fat energy-restricted diet in the long term might have more beneficial effects on weight maintenance and cardiovascular risk factors compared with a low-fat diet. Better dietary adherence with the moderate-fat diet may be the reason for its successful effects.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Endocrine Research Center, Shaheed Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, PO Box 19395-4763, Tehran, Iran.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17298711

Citation

Azadbakht, Leila, et al. "Better Dietary Adherence and Weight Maintenance Achieved By a Long-term Moderate-fat Diet." The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 97, no. 2, 2007, pp. 399-404.
Azadbakht L, Mirmiran P, Esmaillzadeh A, et al. Better dietary adherence and weight maintenance achieved by a long-term moderate-fat diet. Br J Nutr. 2007;97(2):399-404.
Azadbakht, L., Mirmiran, P., Esmaillzadeh, A., & Azizi, F. (2007). Better dietary adherence and weight maintenance achieved by a long-term moderate-fat diet. The British Journal of Nutrition, 97(2), pp. 399-404.
Azadbakht L, et al. Better Dietary Adherence and Weight Maintenance Achieved By a Long-term Moderate-fat Diet. Br J Nutr. 2007;97(2):399-404. PubMed PMID: 17298711.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Better dietary adherence and weight maintenance achieved by a long-term moderate-fat diet. AU - Azadbakht,Leila, AU - Mirmiran,Parvin, AU - Esmaillzadeh,Ahmad, AU - Azizi,Fereidoun, PY - 2007/2/15/pubmed PY - 2007/6/20/medline PY - 2007/2/15/entrez SP - 399 EP - 404 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br. J. Nutr. VL - 97 IS - 2 N2 - The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of a long-term moderate-fat diet (30 % energy from fat) v. a low-fat one (20 % energy from fat) on metabolic risks. The study was a randomised, prospective 14-month trial on overweight and obese patients (eighty-nine overweight and obese men and women). The intervention was a moderate-fat diet (30 % energy) or a low-fat diet (20 % energy). The main outcome measurements were change in body weight, waist circumference, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, total cholesterol, TAG, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Forty-five subjects on the moderate-fat diet and forty-four subjects on the low-fat one were studied. Characteristics of all randomised participants were similar in both groups. After 7 months, the moderate- and low-fat diets had similar effects on cardiovascular risks. The moderate-fat diet was more successful after 14 months in reducing weight (-5.0 (SD 2.5) kg in the moderate-fat group v. -1.2 (SD 1.1) kg in the low-fat one; P < 0.0001), waist circumference (-5.5 (SD 2.4) cm in the moderate-fat group v. - 2.3 (SD 1.3) cm in the low-fat one; P < 0.0001), and other cardiovascular risk factors as well (LDL, TAG, total cholesterol and systolic blood pressure). In conclusion, a moderate-fat energy-restricted diet in the long term might have more beneficial effects on weight maintenance and cardiovascular risk factors compared with a low-fat diet. Better dietary adherence with the moderate-fat diet may be the reason for its successful effects. SN - 0007-1145 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17298711/Better_dietary_adherence_and_weight_maintenance_achieved_by_a_long_term_moderate_fat_diet_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007114507328602/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -