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Misreporting of dietary energy, protein, potassium and sodium in relation to body mass index in young Japanese women.
Eur J Clin Nutr 2008; 62(1):111-8EJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Although under-reporting of dietary intake is more common in persons with a high body mass index (BMI), it is not well known whether or not misreporting is selective for different foods (and hence energy and nutrients), particularly in non-Western populations. We examined misreporting of dietary intake against biomarkers and its relation with BMI in young Japanese women.

DESIGN

Cross-sectional study.

SUBJECTS

A total of 353 female Japanese dietetic students aged 18-22 years (mean BMI: 21.4 kg/m(2), mean fat intake: 29.8% of energy).

METHODS

Misreporting of dietary energy, protein, potassium and sodium (assessed by a self-administered diet history questionnaire) was examined against respective biomarkers (estimated energy expenditure and 24-h urinary excretion). Reporting accuracy was calculated as the ratio of reported intake to that estimated from corresponding biomarkers (complete accuracy: 1.00).

RESULTS

Mean reporting accuracy of absolute intake (amount per day) varied considerably (0.86-1.14). Reporting accuracy of absolute intake decreased with increasing BMI (P for trend <0.001). However, no association was observed between reporting accuracy of energy-adjusted values and BMI (P for trend >0.15), indicating that BMI-dependent misreporting was canceled by energy adjustment. This was owing to positive correlation between the reporting accuracy of energy intake and that of absolute intake of the three nutrients (Pearson correlation coefficient: 0.49-0.67, P<0.0001).

CONCLUSIONS

Although differential misreporting of absolute intake was associated with BMI, differential misreporting of energy-adjusted value was not. These findings support the use of energy-adjusted values in the investigation of diet-disease relationships among lean populations with a low-fat intake.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Nutritional Epidemiology Program, National Institute of Health and Nutrition, Tokyo, Japan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17299459

Citation

Murakami, K, et al. "Misreporting of Dietary Energy, Protein, Potassium and Sodium in Relation to Body Mass Index in Young Japanese Women." European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 62, no. 1, 2008, pp. 111-8.
Murakami K, Sasaki S, Takahashi Y, et al. Misreporting of dietary energy, protein, potassium and sodium in relation to body mass index in young Japanese women. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2008;62(1):111-8.
Murakami, K., Sasaki, S., Takahashi, Y., Uenishi, K., Yamasaki, M., Hayabuchi, H., ... Sugiyama, Y. (2008). Misreporting of dietary energy, protein, potassium and sodium in relation to body mass index in young Japanese women. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 62(1), pp. 111-8.
Murakami K, et al. Misreporting of Dietary Energy, Protein, Potassium and Sodium in Relation to Body Mass Index in Young Japanese Women. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2008;62(1):111-8. PubMed PMID: 17299459.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Misreporting of dietary energy, protein, potassium and sodium in relation to body mass index in young Japanese women. AU - Murakami,K, AU - Sasaki,S, AU - Takahashi,Y, AU - Uenishi,K, AU - Yamasaki,M, AU - Hayabuchi,H, AU - Goda,T, AU - Oka,J, AU - Baba,K, AU - Ohki,K, AU - Kohri,T, AU - Watanabe,R, AU - Sugiyama,Y, Y1 - 2007/02/14/ PY - 2007/2/15/pubmed PY - 2008/3/25/medline PY - 2007/2/15/entrez SP - 111 EP - 8 JF - European journal of clinical nutrition JO - Eur J Clin Nutr VL - 62 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Although under-reporting of dietary intake is more common in persons with a high body mass index (BMI), it is not well known whether or not misreporting is selective for different foods (and hence energy and nutrients), particularly in non-Western populations. We examined misreporting of dietary intake against biomarkers and its relation with BMI in young Japanese women. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SUBJECTS: A total of 353 female Japanese dietetic students aged 18-22 years (mean BMI: 21.4 kg/m(2), mean fat intake: 29.8% of energy). METHODS: Misreporting of dietary energy, protein, potassium and sodium (assessed by a self-administered diet history questionnaire) was examined against respective biomarkers (estimated energy expenditure and 24-h urinary excretion). Reporting accuracy was calculated as the ratio of reported intake to that estimated from corresponding biomarkers (complete accuracy: 1.00). RESULTS: Mean reporting accuracy of absolute intake (amount per day) varied considerably (0.86-1.14). Reporting accuracy of absolute intake decreased with increasing BMI (P for trend <0.001). However, no association was observed between reporting accuracy of energy-adjusted values and BMI (P for trend >0.15), indicating that BMI-dependent misreporting was canceled by energy adjustment. This was owing to positive correlation between the reporting accuracy of energy intake and that of absolute intake of the three nutrients (Pearson correlation coefficient: 0.49-0.67, P<0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: Although differential misreporting of absolute intake was associated with BMI, differential misreporting of energy-adjusted value was not. These findings support the use of energy-adjusted values in the investigation of diet-disease relationships among lean populations with a low-fat intake. SN - 0954-3007 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17299459/Misreporting_of_dietary_energy_protein_potassium_and_sodium_in_relation_to_body_mass_index_in_young_Japanese_women_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.ejcn.1602683 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -