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Glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36) amide response to low versus high glycaemic index preloads in overweight subjects with and without type II diabetes mellitus.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE

Glucagon-like-peptide-1 (7-36) amide (GLP-1) is an insulin secretagogue and potential treatment for type II diabetes mellitus. An alternative to GLP-1 administration is endogenous dietary stimulation. We described a greater GLP-1 release following ingestion of liquids versus solids. We add to this work studying the effect of fluid preloads with differing glycaemic indices (GI) on the metabolic response to a meal.

SUBJECTS AND DESIGN

GLP-1, insulin and glucose responses were measured in six overweight individuals and six subjects with type II diabetes on three occasions, after preload (milk, low GI; Ovaltine Light, high GI; or water, non-nutritive control) and meal ingestion.

RESULTS

In people with and without diabetes, the high GI preload produced the greatest glucose incremental area under the curve (IAUC)(0-20), followed by the low GI preload, and water (P<0.001). In both groups, insulin IAUC(0-20) was higher following high and low GI preloads compared with water (NS). In people without diabetes, the GLP-1 response was higher when high and low GI preloads were consumed compared with water (P=0.041), with no significant difference between nutritive preloads. GLP-1 response did not differ between preloads in people with diabetes. Despite initial differences, total IAUCs(0-200) for biochemical variables did not differ by preload.

CONCLUSION

We confirm that nutritive liquids stimulate GLP-1 to a greater extent than water in subjects without diabetes; however, this does not influence subsequent meal-induced response. The GI of preloads does not influence the degree of GLP-1 stimulation.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Nutrition and Dietetic Research Group, Hammersmith Hospital, London, UK.

    , , , ,

    Source

    European journal of clinical nutrition 61:12 2007 Dec pg 1364-72

    MeSH

    Animals
    Area Under Curve
    Blood Chemical Analysis
    Blood Glucose
    Cross-Over Studies
    Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2
    Dietary Carbohydrates
    Female
    Gastric Emptying
    Glucagon-Like Peptide 1
    Glycemic Index
    Humans
    Insulin
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Milk
    Overweight
    Postprandial Period
    Water

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Randomized Controlled Trial

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    17299480

    Citation

    Milton, J E., et al. "Glucagon-like Peptide-1 (7-36) Amide Response to Low Versus High Glycaemic Index Preloads in Overweight Subjects With and Without Type II Diabetes Mellitus." European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 61, no. 12, 2007, pp. 1364-72.
    Milton JE, Sananthanan CS, Patterson M, et al. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36) amide response to low versus high glycaemic index preloads in overweight subjects with and without type II diabetes mellitus. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2007;61(12):1364-72.
    Milton, J. E., Sananthanan, C. S., Patterson, M., Ghatei, M. A., Bloom, S. R., & Frost, G. S. (2007). Glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36) amide response to low versus high glycaemic index preloads in overweight subjects with and without type II diabetes mellitus. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 61(12), pp. 1364-72.
    Milton JE, et al. Glucagon-like Peptide-1 (7-36) Amide Response to Low Versus High Glycaemic Index Preloads in Overweight Subjects With and Without Type II Diabetes Mellitus. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2007;61(12):1364-72. PubMed PMID: 17299480.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36) amide response to low versus high glycaemic index preloads in overweight subjects with and without type II diabetes mellitus. AU - Milton,J E, AU - Sananthanan,C S, AU - Patterson,M, AU - Ghatei,M A, AU - Bloom,S R, AU - Frost,G S, Y1 - 2007/02/14/ PY - 2007/2/15/pubmed PY - 2008/2/20/medline PY - 2007/2/15/entrez SP - 1364 EP - 72 JF - European journal of clinical nutrition JO - Eur J Clin Nutr VL - 61 IS - 12 N2 - BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Glucagon-like-peptide-1 (7-36) amide (GLP-1) is an insulin secretagogue and potential treatment for type II diabetes mellitus. An alternative to GLP-1 administration is endogenous dietary stimulation. We described a greater GLP-1 release following ingestion of liquids versus solids. We add to this work studying the effect of fluid preloads with differing glycaemic indices (GI) on the metabolic response to a meal. SUBJECTS AND DESIGN: GLP-1, insulin and glucose responses were measured in six overweight individuals and six subjects with type II diabetes on three occasions, after preload (milk, low GI; Ovaltine Light, high GI; or water, non-nutritive control) and meal ingestion. RESULTS: In people with and without diabetes, the high GI preload produced the greatest glucose incremental area under the curve (IAUC)(0-20), followed by the low GI preload, and water (P<0.001). In both groups, insulin IAUC(0-20) was higher following high and low GI preloads compared with water (NS). In people without diabetes, the GLP-1 response was higher when high and low GI preloads were consumed compared with water (P=0.041), with no significant difference between nutritive preloads. GLP-1 response did not differ between preloads in people with diabetes. Despite initial differences, total IAUCs(0-200) for biochemical variables did not differ by preload. CONCLUSION: We confirm that nutritive liquids stimulate GLP-1 to a greater extent than water in subjects without diabetes; however, this does not influence subsequent meal-induced response. The GI of preloads does not influence the degree of GLP-1 stimulation. SN - 0954-3007 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17299480/Glucagon_like_peptide_1__7_36__amide_response_to_low_versus_high_glycaemic_index_preloads_in_overweight_subjects_with_and_without_type_II_diabetes_mellitus_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.ejcn.1602654 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -