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Upper sphincter function during transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation (tLOSR); it is mainly about microburps.
Neurogastroenterol Motil 2007; 19(3):203-10NM

Abstract

Transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations (tLOSRs) are both a dominant mechanism of reflux and an element of the belch reflex. This study aimed to analyse the interplay between reflux and upper oesophageal sphincter (UOS) activity during meal-induced tLOSRs. Fifteen normal subjects were studied with a solid-state high-resolution manometry assembly positioned to record from the hypopharynx to the stomach and a catheter pH electrode 5 cm above the LOS. Subjects ate a 1000-calorie high-fat meal and were monitored for 120 min in a sitting posture. The relationship among tLOSRs, common cavities, pressure changes within the oesophagus and UOS contractile activity were analysed. A total of 218 tLOSRs occurred among the 15 subjects. The majority (79%) were coupled with UOS relaxation and 84% (145/173) of these occurred in association with a common cavity. Upper oesophageal sphincter relaxation was usually preceded by a pressure change in the oesophagus; however, some relaxations (16%) occurred without a discernable increase in pressure or before the pressure increase began. Acid reflux did not appear to play a role in determining UOS response to tLOSRs. The majority of post-prandial tLOSRs were associated with brief periods of UOS relaxation, likely permissive of gas venting (microburps). Intraoesophageal pressure changes likely modulate this UOS response; however, an anticipatory characteristic was evident in some subjects. Whether or not GORD patients with extra-oesophageal symptoms exhibit an exaggeration of the UOS relaxation response during reflux is yet to be determined.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611, USA. j-pandolfino@northwestern.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17300290

Citation

Pandolfino, J E., et al. "Upper Sphincter Function During Transient Lower Oesophageal Sphincter Relaxation (tLOSR); It Is Mainly About Microburps." Neurogastroenterology and Motility : the Official Journal of the European Gastrointestinal Motility Society, vol. 19, no. 3, 2007, pp. 203-10.
Pandolfino JE, Ghosh SK, Zhang Q, et al. Upper sphincter function during transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation (tLOSR); it is mainly about microburps. Neurogastroenterol Motil. 2007;19(3):203-10.
Pandolfino, J. E., Ghosh, S. K., Zhang, Q., Han, A., & Kahrilas, P. J. (2007). Upper sphincter function during transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation (tLOSR); it is mainly about microburps. Neurogastroenterology and Motility : the Official Journal of the European Gastrointestinal Motility Society, 19(3), pp. 203-10.
Pandolfino JE, et al. Upper Sphincter Function During Transient Lower Oesophageal Sphincter Relaxation (tLOSR); It Is Mainly About Microburps. Neurogastroenterol Motil. 2007;19(3):203-10. PubMed PMID: 17300290.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Upper sphincter function during transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation (tLOSR); it is mainly about microburps. AU - Pandolfino,J E, AU - Ghosh,S K, AU - Zhang,Q, AU - Han,A, AU - Kahrilas,P J, PY - 2007/2/16/pubmed PY - 2007/5/5/medline PY - 2007/2/16/entrez SP - 203 EP - 10 JF - Neurogastroenterology and motility : the official journal of the European Gastrointestinal Motility Society JO - Neurogastroenterol. Motil. VL - 19 IS - 3 N2 - Transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations (tLOSRs) are both a dominant mechanism of reflux and an element of the belch reflex. This study aimed to analyse the interplay between reflux and upper oesophageal sphincter (UOS) activity during meal-induced tLOSRs. Fifteen normal subjects were studied with a solid-state high-resolution manometry assembly positioned to record from the hypopharynx to the stomach and a catheter pH electrode 5 cm above the LOS. Subjects ate a 1000-calorie high-fat meal and were monitored for 120 min in a sitting posture. The relationship among tLOSRs, common cavities, pressure changes within the oesophagus and UOS contractile activity were analysed. A total of 218 tLOSRs occurred among the 15 subjects. The majority (79%) were coupled with UOS relaxation and 84% (145/173) of these occurred in association with a common cavity. Upper oesophageal sphincter relaxation was usually preceded by a pressure change in the oesophagus; however, some relaxations (16%) occurred without a discernable increase in pressure or before the pressure increase began. Acid reflux did not appear to play a role in determining UOS response to tLOSRs. The majority of post-prandial tLOSRs were associated with brief periods of UOS relaxation, likely permissive of gas venting (microburps). Intraoesophageal pressure changes likely modulate this UOS response; however, an anticipatory characteristic was evident in some subjects. Whether or not GORD patients with extra-oesophageal symptoms exhibit an exaggeration of the UOS relaxation response during reflux is yet to be determined. SN - 1350-1925 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17300290/Upper_sphincter_function_during_transient_lower_oesophageal_sphincter_relaxation__tLOSR_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2982.2006.00882.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -