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Plasma obestatin and ghrelin levels in subjects with Prader-Willi syndrome.
Am J Med Genet A. 2007 Mar 01; 143A(5):415-21.AJ

Abstract

Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is an obesity syndrome characterized by rapid weight gain and excessive food intake. Food intake is regulated by the hypothalamus but directly influenced by gastrointestinal peptides responding to the nutritional status and body composition of an individual. Ghrelin, derived from preproghrelin, is secreted by the stomach and increases appetite while obestatin, a recently identified peptide derived post-translationally from preproghrelin, works in opposition to ghrelin by decreasing appetite. The objective of this study was to measure fasting obestatin and ghrelin levels in peripheral blood of subjects with PWS and compare to age and gender matched control subjects. Plasma obestatin and ghrelin levels were measured in subjects with PWS (n = 16, mean age = 16.0 +/- 13.3 years; age range 1-44 years) and age and gender matched control subjects (n = 16). Significantly higher obestatin levels were seen in the 16 PWS subjects (398 +/- 102 pg/ml) compared with 16 controls (325 +/- 109 pg/ml; matched t-test, P = 0.04), particularly in 5 young (< or =3 years old) PWS subjects (460 +/- 49 pg/ml) compared with 5 young controls (369 +/- 96 pg/ml; matched t-test, P = 0.03). No significant difference in ghrelin levels was seen between the PWS and comparison groups. No significant correlation was observed for either peptide when compared with body mass index but a significant negative correlation was seen for ghrelin and age in PWS subjects. Our observations suggest that obestatin may be higher in infants with PWS compared to comparison infants. The possibility that obestatin may contribute to the failure to thrive which is common in infants with PWS warrants further investigation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Section of Medical Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Children's Mercy Hospitals and Clinics and University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, Kansas City, Missouri 64108, USA. mgbutler@cmh.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17304548

Citation

Butler, Merlin G., and Douglas C. Bittel. "Plasma Obestatin and Ghrelin Levels in Subjects With Prader-Willi Syndrome." American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part A, vol. 143A, no. 5, 2007, pp. 415-21.
Butler MG, Bittel DC. Plasma obestatin and ghrelin levels in subjects with Prader-Willi syndrome. Am J Med Genet A. 2007;143A(5):415-21.
Butler, M. G., & Bittel, D. C. (2007). Plasma obestatin and ghrelin levels in subjects with Prader-Willi syndrome. American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part A, 143A(5), 415-21.
Butler MG, Bittel DC. Plasma Obestatin and Ghrelin Levels in Subjects With Prader-Willi Syndrome. Am J Med Genet A. 2007 Mar 1;143A(5):415-21. PubMed PMID: 17304548.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Plasma obestatin and ghrelin levels in subjects with Prader-Willi syndrome. AU - Butler,Merlin G, AU - Bittel,Douglas C, PY - 2007/2/17/pubmed PY - 2007/5/12/medline PY - 2007/2/17/entrez SP - 415 EP - 21 JF - American journal of medical genetics. Part A JO - Am. J. Med. Genet. A VL - 143A IS - 5 N2 - Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is an obesity syndrome characterized by rapid weight gain and excessive food intake. Food intake is regulated by the hypothalamus but directly influenced by gastrointestinal peptides responding to the nutritional status and body composition of an individual. Ghrelin, derived from preproghrelin, is secreted by the stomach and increases appetite while obestatin, a recently identified peptide derived post-translationally from preproghrelin, works in opposition to ghrelin by decreasing appetite. The objective of this study was to measure fasting obestatin and ghrelin levels in peripheral blood of subjects with PWS and compare to age and gender matched control subjects. Plasma obestatin and ghrelin levels were measured in subjects with PWS (n = 16, mean age = 16.0 +/- 13.3 years; age range 1-44 years) and age and gender matched control subjects (n = 16). Significantly higher obestatin levels were seen in the 16 PWS subjects (398 +/- 102 pg/ml) compared with 16 controls (325 +/- 109 pg/ml; matched t-test, P = 0.04), particularly in 5 young (< or =3 years old) PWS subjects (460 +/- 49 pg/ml) compared with 5 young controls (369 +/- 96 pg/ml; matched t-test, P = 0.03). No significant difference in ghrelin levels was seen between the PWS and comparison groups. No significant correlation was observed for either peptide when compared with body mass index but a significant negative correlation was seen for ghrelin and age in PWS subjects. Our observations suggest that obestatin may be higher in infants with PWS compared to comparison infants. The possibility that obestatin may contribute to the failure to thrive which is common in infants with PWS warrants further investigation. SN - 1552-4825 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17304548/Plasma_obestatin_and_ghrelin_levels_in_subjects_with_Prader_Willi_syndrome_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.31687 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -