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Clinical impact of antibiotic resistance in respiratory tract infections.
Int J Antimicrob Agents. 2007 Feb; 29 Suppl 1:S6-10.IJ

Abstract

Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most common causative pathogen of community-acquired respiratory tract infections. In vitro evidence indicates that S. pneumoniae is increasingly resistant to commonly prescribed antimicrobial agents including the macrolides. The clinical relevance of resistance, however, has not been clearly established. This article reviews the risk factors influencing selection of resistant pneumococci, discusses endpoints used to assess the impact of resistance on clinical outcome, and proposes strategies to minimise the impact of resistance. Evidence demonstrating treatment failures due to macrolide-resistant S. pneumoniae is also reviewed. Increasing rates of resistance among S. pneumoniae present numerous clinical challenges, and require carefully selected treatment strategies to preserve antibacterial efficacy. Antibiotics with a low propensity for stimulating resistance should be chosen wherever possible.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Hubert Department of Global Health, Rollins School of Public Health, and Division of Infectious Diseases, School of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA. keith.klugman@emory.edu

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17307654

Citation

Klugman, Keith P.. "Clinical Impact of Antibiotic Resistance in Respiratory Tract Infections." International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents, vol. 29 Suppl 1, 2007, pp. S6-10.
Klugman KP. Clinical impact of antibiotic resistance in respiratory tract infections. Int J Antimicrob Agents. 2007;29 Suppl 1:S6-10.
Klugman, K. P. (2007). Clinical impact of antibiotic resistance in respiratory tract infections. International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents, 29 Suppl 1, S6-10.
Klugman KP. Clinical Impact of Antibiotic Resistance in Respiratory Tract Infections. Int J Antimicrob Agents. 2007;29 Suppl 1:S6-10. PubMed PMID: 17307654.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Clinical impact of antibiotic resistance in respiratory tract infections. A1 - Klugman,Keith P, PY - 2007/2/20/pubmed PY - 2007/4/10/medline PY - 2007/2/20/entrez SP - S6 EP - 10 JF - International journal of antimicrobial agents JO - Int J Antimicrob Agents VL - 29 Suppl 1 N2 - Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most common causative pathogen of community-acquired respiratory tract infections. In vitro evidence indicates that S. pneumoniae is increasingly resistant to commonly prescribed antimicrobial agents including the macrolides. The clinical relevance of resistance, however, has not been clearly established. This article reviews the risk factors influencing selection of resistant pneumococci, discusses endpoints used to assess the impact of resistance on clinical outcome, and proposes strategies to minimise the impact of resistance. Evidence demonstrating treatment failures due to macrolide-resistant S. pneumoniae is also reviewed. Increasing rates of resistance among S. pneumoniae present numerous clinical challenges, and require carefully selected treatment strategies to preserve antibacterial efficacy. Antibiotics with a low propensity for stimulating resistance should be chosen wherever possible. SN - 0924-8579 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17307654/Clinical_impact_of_antibiotic_resistance_in_respiratory_tract_infections_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0924-8579(07)70004-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -