Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Polycystic ovary syndrome: a multifaceted disease from adolescence to adult age.
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2006 Dec; 1092:158-74.AN

Abstract

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), one of the most common causes of ovulatory infertility, affects 4-7% of women. Although it was considered that PCOS may have some genetic component and that clinical features of this disorder may change throughout a life span, starting from adolescence to postmenopausal age, no effort has been made to define differences in the phenotype and clinical presentation according to age. Indeed, it has been widely recognized in the last decade that several features of metabolic syndrome (MS), particularly insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia, are inconsistently present in the majority of women with PCOS. This represents an important factor in the evaluation of PCOS throughout life, which implies that PCOS by itself may not be a hyperandrogenic disorder exclusively related to young and fertile-aged women, but may also have some health implications later in life. In young women with PCOS, hyperandrogenism, menses irregularities, and insulin resistance may occur together, emphasizing the pathophysiological role of excess androgen and insulin on PCOS. Hyperandrogenism and infertility represent the major complaints of PCOS in adult fertile age. In addition, obesity and MS may affect more than half these women. Later in life, it becomes clear that the association of obesity (particularly the abdominal phenotype) and PCOS renders affected women more susceptible to develop type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), with some difference in the prevalence rates among countries, suggesting that environmental factors are important in determining individual susceptibility. Little is known about ovarian morphology and androgen production in women with PCOS after menopause. Some studies found that morphological ultrasonographic features consistent with polycystic ovaries are very common in postmenopausal women, and that these features are associated with higher than normal testosterone levels and metabolic alterations. There is an obvious need for further research in this area. Identification of major complaints and features of PCOS during the different ages of an affected woman may help, in fact, to plan individual therapeutic strategies, and, possibly, prevent long-term chronic metabolic diseases.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Internal Medicine, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy. renato.pasquali@unibo.itNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17308142

Citation

Pasquali, Renato, and Alessandra Gambineri. "Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: a Multifaceted Disease From Adolescence to Adult Age." Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, vol. 1092, 2006, pp. 158-74.
Pasquali R, Gambineri A. Polycystic ovary syndrome: a multifaceted disease from adolescence to adult age. Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2006;1092:158-74.
Pasquali, R., & Gambineri, A. (2006). Polycystic ovary syndrome: a multifaceted disease from adolescence to adult age. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1092, 158-74.
Pasquali R, Gambineri A. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: a Multifaceted Disease From Adolescence to Adult Age. Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2006;1092:158-74. PubMed PMID: 17308142.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Polycystic ovary syndrome: a multifaceted disease from adolescence to adult age. AU - Pasquali,Renato, AU - Gambineri,Alessandra, PY - 2007/2/20/pubmed PY - 2007/4/20/medline PY - 2007/2/20/entrez SP - 158 EP - 74 JF - Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences JO - Ann N Y Acad Sci VL - 1092 N2 - Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), one of the most common causes of ovulatory infertility, affects 4-7% of women. Although it was considered that PCOS may have some genetic component and that clinical features of this disorder may change throughout a life span, starting from adolescence to postmenopausal age, no effort has been made to define differences in the phenotype and clinical presentation according to age. Indeed, it has been widely recognized in the last decade that several features of metabolic syndrome (MS), particularly insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia, are inconsistently present in the majority of women with PCOS. This represents an important factor in the evaluation of PCOS throughout life, which implies that PCOS by itself may not be a hyperandrogenic disorder exclusively related to young and fertile-aged women, but may also have some health implications later in life. In young women with PCOS, hyperandrogenism, menses irregularities, and insulin resistance may occur together, emphasizing the pathophysiological role of excess androgen and insulin on PCOS. Hyperandrogenism and infertility represent the major complaints of PCOS in adult fertile age. In addition, obesity and MS may affect more than half these women. Later in life, it becomes clear that the association of obesity (particularly the abdominal phenotype) and PCOS renders affected women more susceptible to develop type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), with some difference in the prevalence rates among countries, suggesting that environmental factors are important in determining individual susceptibility. Little is known about ovarian morphology and androgen production in women with PCOS after menopause. Some studies found that morphological ultrasonographic features consistent with polycystic ovaries are very common in postmenopausal women, and that these features are associated with higher than normal testosterone levels and metabolic alterations. There is an obvious need for further research in this area. Identification of major complaints and features of PCOS during the different ages of an affected woman may help, in fact, to plan individual therapeutic strategies, and, possibly, prevent long-term chronic metabolic diseases. SN - 0077-8923 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17308142/Polycystic_ovary_syndrome:_a_multifaceted_disease_from_adolescence_to_adult_age_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1196/annals.1365.014 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
Try the Free App:
Prime PubMed app for iOS iPhone iPad
Prime PubMed app for Android
Prime PubMed is provided
free to individuals by:
Unbound Medicine.